Jan 27, 2023  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

Course Descriptions


 

Business

  
  •  

    BUS 390 - Production and Service Operations Management

    (4)
    Operations management involves the synchronization of business processes to optimize performance.  Production and Service Operations Management (P&SOM) focuses on managerial issues arising in the operation of both manufacturing and service industries.  Students consider the language, concepts, insights and tools to deal with operational issues, and how to gain competitive advantage through operations.  A process view of operations is used to analyze key operational dimensions such as capacity management, cycle time management, supply chain and logistics management and quality management. (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): MATH 215 , Junior standing, and BUS 221  (this course may be taken concurrently).
  
  •  

    BUS 393 - Selected Topics

    (1-4)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  •  

    BUS 411 - Advanced Accounting

    (4)
    A study of current advanced topics in accounting, such as partnership, equity investments, business combinations, consolidated financial statements, foreign currency translations, and derivative securities. As well as an introduction of fund and budgetary accounting as it applies to government and not-for-profit organizations in education and health care. (Offered spring.) Prerequisite(s): BUS 312 .
  
  •  

    BUS 412 - Introduction to Taxation

    (2)
    An introduction to the federal taxation of individuals and business entities, sources of federal tax law, tax procedure, tax research techniques, tax accounting methods, property transactions and investments. (Offered spring.) Prerequisite(s): BUS 211  and BUS 213 
  
  •  

    BUS 413 - Individual Income Tax

    (2)
    An introduction to the income tax structure and tax principles affecting individual taxpayers. (Offered fall.) Prerequisite(s):  .
  
  •  

    BUS 414 - Business Tax Accounting

    (2)
    An introduction to income tax accounting for Corporations, S corporations, and partnerships. (Offered fall) Prerequisite(s):  .
  
  •  

    BUS 415 - Cost Accounting

    (2)
    Design of historical cost find systems and the role of accounting in managerial decision making.  Illustrates application of cost data for decisions on capacity utilization, inventory planning, budgeting, product pricing, and non-routine business decisions.(Offered spring.) Prerequisite(s): BUS 213 .
  
  •  

    BUS 417 - Auditing

    (4)
    A study of current theory and practices of the integrated audit of financial statements and internal control over financial reporting.  (Offered fall.) Prerequisite(s):  .
  
  •  

    BUS 421 - Investments

    (4)


    This course introduces students to the investment process, different asset classes, portfolio management and financial hedging using options and futures. Primary emphasis is on the fundamentals of stocks and bonds investments, with introduction to modern portfolio theory and security analysis. The course covers the valuation of stocks, fixed income securities and businesses. Real life valuations of companies are an inherent part of the course and students will be able to apply discounted cash flow analysis and relative valuation techniques to value a security. (Offered spring.) Prerequisite(s):  .

    .

  
  •  

    BUS 433 - Marketing Strategy & Management

    (4)


    Application of problem-solving techniques in the area of marketing management. Emphasis on planning and implementing the marketing effort, managing the marketing organization and controlling marketing operations. This is the capstone marketing course for students seeking a marketing major. (Offered fall / spring.)

      Prerequisite(s): BUS 333 BUS 335  and senior standing or permission of instructor.

  
  •  

    BUS 450 - Business Policy and Strategy

    (4)
    Business Policy and Strategy, commonly referred to as the “capstone” business course is designed to integrate all of the functional areas of business. Students are introduced to a few new strategic concepts and analytic tools. However, the focus of the course is on integrating the knowledge and skills developed in all prior business courses. Students perform both industry level and company level analyses. This is accomplished through the use of case studies and a computer simulation. (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): Business Core and senior class standing.
  
  •  

    BUS 451 - Advanced Case Analysis

    (1)
    In this course students will learn how to digest a case, identify the most important elements, determine and rationalize alternative courses of action, and recommend the best course of action. High performing students will be asked, but not required to participate in the Tau Pi Phi case competition.  Although the course is open to all business students, business students wanting to complete Capital University’s Honors Program must take this course along with Honors 305 and Honors 405. Students who wish to complete the Capital University Honors Program MUST compete in the Tau Pi Phi case competition. Offered every spring) Prerequisite(s): BUS101, BUS131, BUS211, BUS213, BUS240, BUS242 and BUS260.
  
  •  

    BUS 491 - Individual Study

    (1-6)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  •  

    BUS 492 - Accounting Internship

    (2-8)
    Students secure full-time and part-time internships through a competitive interview process.  They work under the supervision of the sponsor and a faculty member.  Interns typically work in auditing, tax, corporate, or governmental accounting.  (Offered as needed.) Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing and permission of instructor. (Graded P/F)
  
  •  

    BUS 493 - Selected Topics

    (1-3)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  •  

    BUS 494 - Entrepreneurship Internship

    (2-6)


    Students may earn credit for program related work at participating organizations and will work under the supervision of the sponsor and a faculty member.  (Graded P/F) (Offered as needed.)

     

  
  •  

    BUS 495 - Finance Internship

    (2-8)
    Students may earn credit for program related work at participating organizations and will work under the supervision of the sponsor and a faculty member.  (Offered as needed.) Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing and permission of instructor. (Graded P/F)
  
  •  

    BUS 496 - Human Resource Internship

    (1 - 4)
    Students may earn credit for program related work at participating organizations and will work under the supervision of the sponsor and a faculty member.  (Offered as needed.) Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing and permission of instructor. (Graded P/F)
  
  •  

    BUS 497 - Management Internship

    (2-6)
    Students may earn credit for program related work at participating organizations and will work under the supervision of the sponsor and a faculty member.  (Offered as needed.) Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing and permission of instructor. (Graded P/F)
  
  •  

    BUS 498 - Marketing Internship

    (2-6)
    Students may earn credit for program related work at participating organizations and will work under the supervision of the sponsor and a faculty member.  (Offered as needed.) Prerequisite(s): 8 hours of marketing courses beyond   and permission of instructor. (Graded P/F)

Chemistry

  
  •  

    CHEM 101 - Chemical Principles IA

    (4)
    Fundamental principles of chemistry: stoichiometry, atomic structure, chemical energetics, chemical bonding, states of matter and solutions. Required lab includes topics listed above. Prerequisite(s): MATH 110  or placement in to MATH 120  or higher. Corequisite(s): CHEM 101L and CHEM 101W. Offered fall and summer.
  
  •  

    CHEM 102 - Chemical Principles IIA

    (4)
    A further study of principles: introductory physical chemistry including chemical kinetics, equilibrium, the second law of thermodynamics, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry. Required lab includes inorganic qualitative Analysis and topics listed above. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 101 .  Corequisite(s): CHEM-102L and CHEM-102W. Offered spring and summer.
  
  •  

    CHEM 115 - Integrated Science by Inquiry

    (4)
    Utilizing an inquiry-based approach, this course focuses on the Nature of Science. Topics present science in an integrated manner while students ask and answer their own scientific questions. Same course offered as BIOL 115  and PHYS 115 .
  
  •  

    CHEM 132 - Chemical Calculations

    (1)

    A quantitative study of stoichiometry, the gas laws and enthalpy for students who have taken CHEM 150  and wish to take CHEM 102 . With permission of the Department Chair.

  
  •  

    CHEM 150 - General, Organic and Biological Chemistry

    (4)
    This course serves as an introduction to the fundamental principles of general, organic, and biological chemistry that are needed by those in the health professions. This course is a prerequisite to no other advanced chemistry course Prerequisite(s): There are no pre-requisites to this course, although a good math and science background is helpful. Corequisite(s): CHEM-150L and CHEM-150W.  Offered fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CHEM 210 - Organic Chemistry of Biological Molecules

    (3)
    The course is intended as a one-semester pathway to biochemistry.  Topics include structure and bonding of organic molecules, functional groups, stereochemistry, nomenclature, physical and chemical properties and biological functions of alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carbohydrates, carboxylic acids and their diratives, lipids, amines, amino acids, and proteins.  This course does not satisfy the prerequisites for CHEM 232 Organic Chemistry II . Prerequisite(s): CHEM 102 Chemical Principles IIA .
  
  •  

    CHEM 221 - Chem Analysis I

    (4)
    Titrimetric and instrumental methods of chemical analysis. Specific topics include analytical and statistical calculations and an extensive treatment of precipitation, acid-base titration, oxidation-reduction, and complex formation reactions as applied to analytical chemistry. Required lab includes topics listed above. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 102 
  
  •  

    CHEM 231 - Organic Chemistry I

    (3)
    Structure, nomenclature, physical properties, preparation and reactions of hydrocarbons; nature of the covalent bonds formed by the carbon atom, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms and spectrometric analysis. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 233  unless the 231 instructor waives this requirement. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 102 . Corequisite(s): CHEM-231W and  .  Offered fall and summer.
  
  •  

    CHEM 232 - Organic Chemistry II

    (3)


    The chemistry of halides, alcohols, carbonyl compounds, amines, phenols, carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 234  unless the 232 instructor waives this requirement. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 231 . Corequisite(s): CHEM 232W and CHEM 234 .  Offered spring and summer. 

     

  
  •  

    CHEM 233 - Organic Chemistry I Lab

    (1)
    An inquiry-based laboratory study of organic chemistry. An inquiry-based laboratory study of organic chemistry. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 231  or CHEM 210  unless the instructor waives this requirement. Corequisite(s): CHEM 231  or CHEM 210 .  
  
  •  

    CHEM 234 - Organic Chemistry II Lab

    (1)
    A laboratory study of organic chemistry with emphasis on qualitative analysis. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 232  unless the CHEM 232  instructor waives this requirement. Corequisite(s): CHEM 232 . Offered spring and summer.
  
  •  

    CHEM 235 - Organic Chemistry

    (4)
    The scope of this course is functional group chemistry [hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols (diols, thiols and epoxides), carbonyls (aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives), amines, phenols] including the nature of covalent bonds, stereochemistry (geometric, conformational and stereoisomers) and reaction mechanisms. This course is only for students enrolled in the Summer Institute in Science and Math who are not matriculating at Capital University. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 101  CHEM 102 .
  
  •  

    CHEM 311 - Inorganic Chemistry

    (4)
    Atomic structure, principles of chemical bonding, ionic solids, acids and bases, solvent systems, coordination complexes, and a systematic overview of the periodic table. Inorganic nomenclature. The descriptive chemistry of the main group elements. Required lab includes synthesis of unusual inorganic compounds and topics listed above. Offered in the Fall of even years. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 102 .
  
  •  

    CHEM 341 - Physical Chemistry I

    (4)
    The laws and theories of chemistry; applications of thermodynamics to chemical systems; electrochemistry. Required lab includes topics listed above. Offered in the Fall of odd years. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 102 , MATH 231 , PHYS 221 .
  
  •  

    CHEM 342 - Physical Chemistry II

    (4)
    Continuation of Physical Chemistry I; emphasis upon quantum theory, kinetics, and computational chemistry. Required lab includes topics listed above. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 341 . Offered in the Spring of even years.
  
  •  

    CHEM 422 - Chem Analysis II

    (4)
    Recent developments in chemical analysis, application of electromagnetic, electrical and chromatographic processes to analytical problems. Required lab includes topics listed above. Offered Spring of odd years. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 221 ; CHEM 341 .
  
  •  

    CHEM 451 - Biochemistry

    (3)
    A study of the structures and functions of biological systems at the molecular level with a focus on proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, nucleic acids and cellular metabolism using quantitative concepts including kinetics, thermodynamics and solution properties of macromolecules. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 232  or CHEM 210 . Offered fall and summer.
  
  •  

    CHEM 452 - Biochemistry Lab

    (1)
    A laboratory study of biochemistry with experiments focusing on carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 234 CHEM 451  .Offered spring even years.
  
  •  

    CHEM 454 - Biochemistry II

    (3)
    A molecular analysis of biological processes including biosynthesis of metabolites, metabolic regulation and information flow in biological systems, transcription, translation and protein processing. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 451 . Offered spring and summer.
  
  •  

    CHEM 481 - Seminar

    (1)
    Oral presentations by students on topics not covered in the curriculum; presentations by students doing research; lectures by visiting scientists and the faculty. Offered fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CHEM 482 - Oral Exam

    (1)
    Participation in CHEM 481  plus successful completion of an oral examination given by the faculty and covering selected aspects of chemistry. The oral examination must be passed in order to graduate with any departmental major. Prerequisite(s): Two credits  . Offered fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CHEM 491 - Individual Study

    (0-6)
    Chemical research usually requiring a literature search, original research in the laboratory under the direction of a faculty member, and a formal written report. Juniors and seniors taking CHEM 491 can present the work orally as part of CHEM 481  (seminar).
  
  •  

    CHEM 493 - Selected Topics

    (1-4)
  
  •  

    CHEM 495 - Internship

    (1-8)
    Real-world experience in a chemistry-related position. Ordinarily for seniors. Requirement: Permission of the chair of the chemistry department.

Communication

  
  •  

    COMM 100 - Pre-Professional Studies

    (0-3)
    Laboratory experience in debate, forensics and projects in performance studies or organizational communication. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 hours.  (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  •  

    COMM 100H - Pre-Professional Studies

    (3)
    Laboratory experience in debate, forensics and projects in performance studies or organizational communication. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 hours.  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): Honors Program.
  
  •  

    COMM 131 - Media and Society

    (3)
    Critical approaches to multiple media texts, examining their creation, development, and relationships to society and culture.  (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  •  

    COMM 151 - Interpersonal Communication

    (3)
    Application of theory and practical experiential activities to provide insights for improving one’s relationships with others. Understanding of one’s present ways of communicating and exposure to alternatives that can lead to change.  (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  •  

    COMM 193 - Selected Topics

    (1-6)
    Repeatable under different topics.  (Offered as needed.)
  
  •  

    COMM 201 - Introduction to the Study of Human Communication

    (3)
    This course is designed to introduce students to the formal study of human communication. Students will learn how to read scholarly literature, design and conduct a research investigation, analyze findings and discuss the relevance of their findings. Students also will have extensive exposure to qualitative research methodologies that are commonly used in communication research, will learn about descriptive statistics, and will learn how to develop theoretical explanations that are grounded in theory.  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): COMM 151  or COMM 352 
  
  •  

    COMM 212 - Civic Forums, Groups & Parliamentary Practice

    (3)
    The fundamentals of parliamentary practice in deliberative assemblies as well as processes of small group problem-solving as encountered in social, business, professional and governmental organizations. (Offered fall.) Prerequisite(s): UC 120 .
  
  •  

    COMM 213 - Visual Communication

    (3)
    The study of “visual literacy,” or the ability to interpret and create visual communication. This course is designed to help students understand how visual imagery functions aesthetically, communicatively, historically and culturally.  (Offered as needed.)
  
  •  

    COMM 251 - Communication and Culture

    (3)
    Exploration of the ways cultural factors affect communication topics include values, use of language, non-verbal communication, and dealing with conflict.. (Same course offered as CLS 251 .)  (Offered spring.)
  
  •  

    COMM 253 - Communication and Gender

    (3)
    The purpose of this course is to provide a foundation for students’ understanding of the complex relationship between communication and gender at the interpersonal, institutional and societal levels. (Same course offered as CLS 253 .)  (Offered odd years.)
  
  •  

    COMM 293 - Selected Topics

    (1-6)
    Repeatable under different topics.  (Offered as needed.)
  
  •  

    COMM 300 - Advanced Pre-Professional Studies

    (0-3)
    Advanced laboratory experience in debate, forensics and projects in performance studies or organizational communication. Repeatable for a maximum of 11 hours.  (Offered fall, spring.) Prerequisite(s): COMM 100 .
  
  •  

    COMM 300H - Advanced Pre-Professional Studies

    (3)
    Advanced laboratory experience in debate, forensics and projects in performance studies or organizational communication. Repeatable for a maximum of 11 hours.  (Offered fall, spring.) Prerequisite(s): COMM 100  and Honors Program.
  
  •  

    COMM 301 - Professional Development

    (1)
    This course employs a workshop-format to help communication majors with the construction of an electronic portfolio and with resume and career preparation.  (Offered fall.) Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
  
  •  

    COMM 311 - Strategic Influence in Human Communication

    (3)
    The study of how humans use communication in their attempts to influence others’ values, attitudes, beliefs or behaviors, especially in relationship to non-print and print media and other aspects of culture. Emphasis also is given to identification and analysis of influence efforts.  (Offered as needed.) Prerequisite(s): UC 120  and sophomore standing.
  
  •  

    COMM 312 - Public Deliberation

    (3)
    This course combines study and performance in the composition of different forms of critical-argumentative discourse for diverse audiences and purposes, and in both oral and written formats. It also provides for analysis of the argumentation process in the formation of public policy, and includes study of research techniques and methods for the interpretation and evaluation of evidence and argument.  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): UC 120  and sophomore standing.
  
  •  

    COMM 313 - Civic Discourse

    (3)
    Combines the opportunity for individual development of advanced performance skills in public speaking with a broader analytical understanding of the history of public communication in America.  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): UC 120  and sophomore standing.
  
  •  

    COMM 314 - Contemporary Issues in Strategic Influence

    (3)
    A study of contemporary practices in political persuasion including use of mass media and the social effects of strategies and persuasive choices in the public sphere.  (Offered as needed.) Prerequisite(s): UC 120  and sophomore standing.
  
  •  

    COMM 315 - Civilization, Technologies, and Influence

    (3)
    Historical survey of the evolution of interactions between conceptions of human communication and ideas of social order, political process, artistic creativity and spiritual practice: Rhetoric is explained as a historical force as well as an intellectual instrument in the story of the humanities and Western civilization.  (Offered as needed.) Prerequisite(s): UC 120  and sophomore standing.
  
  •  

    COMM 352 - Group Discussion

    (3)
    This course involves study and performance in different forms of oral and written discourse within small group communication. It includes examination of the place of discussion in society, techniques by which groups explore problems, and the ways in which interpersonal relationships develop and become stabilized in the group setting. While exploring techniques to enhance the intellectual productivity of small group discussion, the course offers the opportunity to develop leadership skills and participant responsibility.  (Offered spring.) Prerequisite(s): UC 120  and sophomore standing.
  
  •  

    COMM 353 - Organizational Communication

    (3)
    The study of the role of communication within the contexts of complex human organizations, including special characteristics of communication in work settings and the application of communication principles in promoting organizational effectiveness.  (Offered fall.) Prerequisite(s): UC 120  and sophomore standing.
  
  •  

    COMM 393 - Selected Topics

    (1-6)
    Repeatable under different topics.  (Offered as needed.)
  
  •  

    COMM 395 - Communication Internship

    (1-12)
    Qualified students work on-site with professional supervision in a variety of organizational settings.  Departmental internships may be repeated up to a maximum of 12 hours. (Offered each semester.) Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    COMM 401 - Communication Capstone Project

    (1)


    The focus of this course, the capstone project, is intended to provide communication majors with an opportunity to produce scholarship that highlights the integration of their course work, knowledge, skill and experiential learning.  Working with a faculty mentor, the student will conduct research, do an in-depth study of a specialized topic, and/or develop a substantial creative project.  (Offered fall/spring.)

     

      Prerequisite(s): COMM 201 .

  
  •  

    COMM 415 - Free Speech in the Digital Age

    (3)
    The historical and legal background of free speech as a foundation for civic discourse and democratic processes is explained. This course elaborates the American Constitutional tradition as well as exploring traditional principles through  which the new challenges of the 21st century communication environment will need to be met. (Offered every other fall.) Prerequisite(s): UC-120 and sophomore standing.
  
  •  

    COMM 491 - Individual Study

    (3-6)
    Specialized study in an area of communications under the supervision of a faculty member with an approved format.  (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  •  

    COMM 493 - Selected Topics

    (1-6)
    Repeatable under different topics.  (Offered as needed.)
  
  •  

    COMM 495 - Internship

    (0-12)
    Qualified students may apply in areas of communication other than media-TV or public relations. Opportunities include organizational communication and forensics events. Repeatable to a maximum of 12 hours.  (Offered fall/spring/summer.)

Computational Science

  
  •  

    CSAC 225 - Calculus and Modeling for Biological Sciences

    (4)
    An introduction to mathematical modeling and calculus with applications to biology. Topics include limits, continuity, derivatives, definite and indefinite integrals. Students will employ computational software to solve problems and to analyze models of various biological processes. Prerequisite(s): MATH 121 Trigonometry  or placement into CSAC 225. (same course offered as  ).
  
  •  

    CSAC 245 - Computational Science I

    (3)
    Fulfills Quantitative Reasoning Goal. An introduction to the problems and solution methodologies in computational science. Computational tools such as a computer algebra system, a high performance computing engine, visualization software and Internet resources will be used to explore and solve mathematical problems drawn from various fields of science. (Same course offered as CS 245 .) Corequisite(s): MATH 225  or MATH 230 .
  
  •  

    CSAC 335 - Differential Equations and Dynamical Systems

    (3)
    A modeling approach is used to cover techniques for solving a variety of Ordinary Differential Equations (ODE): linear (first and higher order), non-linear, and systems of ODEs. The course also examines methodologies for solving linear and non-linear continuous dynamic systems.  Prerequisite(s):  ; (same course offered as  ). Offered spring semester of even years.
  
  
  •  

    CSAC 391 - Computational Chemistry

    (3)
    Topics include models for the rotation and vibration of diatomic and polyatomic molecules and their visualization, molecular mechanics using semi-empirical force fields, and molecular dynamics of polypeptides, polynucleotides, and their interactions with drugs. (Same course offered as CHEM 391 .) Prerequisite(s): CHEM 102 ,PHYS 221 ,CSAC 245  or CS 245 ;
  
  •  

    CSAC 392 - Computational Biology

    (3)
    An exploration of bioinformatics and mathematical biology. Topics include sequence alignment and analysis of DNA and proteins, modeling the physiology of the heart, statistical analysis of biology data, and the use of web-based databases. Prerequisite(s): MATH 121  or MATH-130.
  
  •  

    CSAC 393 - Computational Environmental Science

    (3)
    This course is designed to stimulate critical thinking about environmental science principles using computational modeling methodologies. Some topics to be covered included groundwater and contaminant transport, phosphorus cycling in surface waters, and global climate change. Prerequisite(s): CSAC 245  or CS 245 
  
  •  

    CSAC 394 - Comp Neuroscience and Psychology

    (3)
    This course provides a modeling approach in the fields of psychology and neuroscience. Topics may include decision making, learning models, neuro imaging techniques, and neural networks.
  
  •  

    CSAC 396 - Computational Physics

    (3)
    This course is designed to introduce some of the computational methods used in physics. Students will work in groups and are expected to use prior knowledge from calculus, general physics, and computational science to develop appropriate strategies for solving problems. Use of a combination of different methodologies (algebraic, numerical, graphical/visual) is expected. (Same course offered as PHYS 396 .) Prerequisite(s):  
  
  •  

    CSAC 397 - Scientific Visualization

    (3)
    This course provides a general introduction to the terminology, methodology, and applications of scientific visualization. Methods for visualizing surface and volumetric data from a variety of scientific fields including both static medical data and time varying data are presented. The standard generic pipeline for converting numerical data to visual representations is presented using the VTK software package. (Same course offered as CS 397 .) Prerequisite(s): CS 161 ; Offered fall semester in even years.
  
  •  

    CSAC 435 - Computational and Numerical Methods

    (3)
    Students explore the solution methodology of problems in computational science with an emphasis on numerical techniques. Topics include error analysis, numerical integration and differentiation, FFTs, solutions of linear systems, and numerical solutions of ODEs. (Same course offered as MATH 435 .) Prerequisite(s): CSAC 245  or CS 245 ; MATH 231 ; Offered spring semester in odd years.
  
  •  

    CSAC 445 - Research Experience in Computational Science

    (3)
    A capstone research experience usually comprising a comprehensive literature review, design, and implementation of computational science techniques to solve a problem in the behavioral, computer, financial, mathematical, natural, physical, or social sciences. May also be an internship experience. This course is repeatable for additional credit. Prerequisite(s): CSAC 435 ; 1 courses; From Department CSAC; Except courses CSAC 435 ; and one CSAC elective course.
  
  •  

    CSAC 476 - Introduction to High Performance Computing

    (3)
    Introduction to the use of high-performance computing systems in science and engineering. The physical aspects of a variety of problems are surveyed and techniques for solving the problems on a variety of high-performance computers are analyzed. Prerequisite(s): CSAC 376 . Offered spring semester in odd years.

Computer Science

  
  •  

    CS 160 - Introduction to Computer Science

    (3)
    Algorithm design, algorithm development techniques and programming with emphasis on good program style. Topics include control, functions, arrays, classes and files. Offered fall semester. Corequisite(s): MATH 120 
  
  •  

    CS 161 - Algorithms and Data Structures I

    (3)
    Searching and sorting, recursion, comparative efficiencies of algorithms, and elementary data structures including stacks, queues, linked lists, graphs and trees. Offered spring semester. Prerequisite(s): CS 160  (Minimum grade C).
  
  •  

    CS 170 - Introduction to Unix

    (1)
    An introduction to the UNIX operating system including: shell commands, editors, electronic mail, network communication, development tools and special topics. Offered spring semester.
  
  •  

    CS 175 - Programming in Java

    (2)
    An introduction to the Java programming language and its applications. Offered fall semester in even years. Prerequisite(s): CS 161 .
  
  •  

    CS 201 - Foundations of Computer Architecture

    (4)


    An introduction to the basics of digital logic and the design and organization of modern hardware components including processors and memory. Included are laboratory experiences in the design and implementation of digital circuits and the development of assembly language programs that demonstrate architecture concepts, such as data representations, instruction sets, pipelining, and the memory hierarchy. Offered fall semester in even years.

      Prerequisite(s): CS 161 .

  
  •  

    CS 230 - Introduction to Database Systems

    (3)
    An introduction to the theoretical foundations and practical uses of database systems, with emphasis on the relational database model. Topics include the entity-relationship model, design and normalization of relational database tables, SQL, transaction management, and concurrency control. Offered fall semester in odd years. Prerequisite(s): CS 160 .
  
  •  

    CS 245 - Computational Science I

    (3)
    Fulfills Quantitative Reasoning Goal. An introduction to the problems and solution methodologies in computational science. Computational tools such as a computer algebra system, a procedural language, a high performance computing engine, visualization software and Internet resources will be addressed and used to explore and solve mathematical problems drawn from various fields of science.  Offered spring semester.  Corequisite(s):   or   or MATH 231  or  .
  
  •  

    CS 330 - Software Engineering

    (3)
    A study of software engineering techniques as they apply to large software projects. A major software project involving all phases of the software engineering model including requirements, specification, planning, design, implementation, testing, and documentation and maintenance is included. Offered spring semester in odd years. Prerequisite(s): CS 161  (Minimum grade C).
  
  •  

    CS 340 - Programming Languages

    (3)
    Language design issues, data types, formal translation models, sequence and subprogram control, programming language semantics and language paradigms. Offered spring semester in even years. Prerequisite(s): CS 161 .
  
  •  

    CS 361 - Algorithms and Data Structure II

    (3)
    An advanced discussion of data structures and their role in the design of algorithms. Topics include: quantitative measures of algorithm efficiency, abstract data types, and alternative implementations of classic data structures. Offered fall semester in odd years. Prerequisite(s): CS 161  (Minimum grade C).
  
  •  

    CS 376 - Introduction to Parallel Computing

    (3)
    A first course in the design, analysis and development of parallel and distributed algorithms on different architectures.  Offered fall semester in even years.  Prerequisite(s): CS 161  (Minimum grade C). Same course offered as  .
  
  •  

    CS 377 - Computer Graphics I

    (3)
    An introduction to computer graphics hardware and software. Topics include user interfaces, event-driven computing, two-dimensional graphics primitives, area and polygon filling, clipping algorithms, splines and transformations. Offered spring semester in even years. Prerequisite(s): CS 361 .
  
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    CS 380 - Operating Systems

    (2)
    An introduction to modern operating system. Topics include the structure of an operating system, process management, synchronization, critical sections, semaphores, deadlock handling, memory management, process scheduling, and security. The major components of Unix/Linux and its derivatives (processes, threads, sockets, etc.) will be explored more in details. Prerequisite(s): CS 161 Algorithms and Data Structures I  (Minimum grade C).
  
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    CS 381 - Parallel Computing

    (2)
    An introduction to parallel and distributed computing including. Topics include race conditions and different approaches to solve them, processes, threads, and parallel algorithms. Students will write programs implementing parallel algorithms using processes and threads. Prerequisite(s): CS 380 Operating Systems .
  
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    CS 397 - Scientific Visualization

    (3)
    This course provides a general introduction to the terminology, methodology, and applications of scientific visualization. Methods for visualizing surface and volumetric data from a variety of scientific fields including both static medical data and time varying data are presented. The standard generic pipeline for converting numerical data to visual representations is presented using the VTK software package. (Same course offered as CSAC 397 .) Offered whenever there is sufficient demand. Prerequisite(s): CS 161 .
 

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