Jun 15, 2024  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

Course Descriptions


 

French

  
  • FRNCH 330 - French Civilization

    (4)
    Fulfills Humanities Goal. History, art, architecture, music, and unique contributions of France to the rest of the world from the Roman occupation of Gaul through the Middle Ages and Renaissance to the current time. Videos, films, internet assignments, literary readings, recordings, lectures, discussions, and group work in French. Prerequisite(s): FRNCH 310  or FRNCH 311 , or permission of instructor.
  
  • FRNCH 350 - Intro to French Literature

    (4)
    Survey of the genres and movements and selected major writers in French literature from the Middle Ages through the 20th century; reading and discussion of Representative texts. Prerequisite(s): FRNCH 310  or FRNCH 311 , or permission of instructor.
  
  • FRNCH 361 - French Phonetics

    (4)
    An in-depth study of the sounds of the French language, including pronunciation and liaison rules; extensive practice in listening, speaking and transcribing, using the International Phonetic Alphabet, in view of perfecting oral expression and listening comprehension. Prerequisite(s): FRNCH 230 ; or permission of instructor.
  
  • FRNCH 371 - Francophone Culture

    (4)
    Fulfills Global Awareness Goal. History, art, music, literature, and customs of the Francophone world with particular attention to political and social developments in Francophone Africa, the French Caribbean, Middle East, and French-speaking Canada. Videos, short stories, novels, excerpts and other representative literature. Extensive listening and reading experience. (Same course offered as CLS 371.) Prerequisite(s): 1 course from Level 300, or permission of instructor.
  
  • FRNCH 380 - Contemporary France

    (4)
    Study of the life, attitudes, institutions, and culture of France today, with emphasis on the modern family, the governmental, educational, political, judicial and fiscal systems, regionalism, minorities, the economy and its world relationships, with emphasis on France’s role within the European Union.  Prerequisite(s): FRNCH 310  or FRNCH 311 ; one course from Levels 300, 400; Except courses FRNCH 310 , FRNCH 311 , or permission of instructor.
  
  • FRNCH 391 - Individual Study

    (1-4)
    Intended for French majors and minors who wish to study material not covered by a regularly offered course. May not be repeated more than once without permission of the department. Prerequisite(s): Permission of department chair.
  
  • FRNCH 410 - French Theater

    (4)
    Fulfills Fine Arts Goal. An examination of the development of French theater from the Middle Ages through the Enlightenment, Romantic period and modern Theater of the Absurd. Scenes and acts from each play will be performed in class (no memorization); lectures, discussion, videos, group work and extensive reading in French; oral and written reports. Prerequisite(s): FRNCH 310  or FRNCH 311 ; and one other FRENCH class on the 300 or 400 level, or permission of instructor.
  
  • FRNCH 491 - Individual Study

    (1-4)
    Intended for French majors and minors who wish to study material not covered by a regularly offered course. May not be repeated more than once without permission of department. Prerequisite(s): FRNCH 310  or FRNCH 311 , or permission of instructor.
  
  • FRNCH 493 - Selected Topics

    (1-4)

Geography

  
  • GEOG 111 - World Geography

    (3)
    Human activities and wants in the world, as they relate to physical environment and geographic position, are studied. Students are provided with an understanding of the links people make around the world as they have attempted to address common problems in the past and continue to address them presently. The decisions individuals and societies have made and currently make about these human activities and wants, in relation to physical environment and geographic position, are analyzed.  (Offered fall.)
  
  • GEOG 491 - Individual Study

    (1-3)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  • GEOG 493 - Selected Topics

    (3)
    (Offered as needed.)

Geology

  
  • GEOL 220 - Introduction to Astronomy

    (3)
    Natural Science Group A:  An introductory survey of astronomy. Topics will be selected from observational methods, solar system, stars (structure and evolution), galaxies and cosmology. Field trips for observation (late night/early morning) and/or visits to planetaria are included. Prerequisite(s): UC 140 , MATH 215 , MATH 230 , MATH 231 , MATH 251 , or  . (Offered fall semester)
  
  • GEOL 250 - Physical Geology

    (4)
    Natural Science Group B: Examines the structure and composition of the Earth, and evolution of surface features by geologic processes including river systems, wind transport, glacial activity and physical and chemical oceanography. Other topics include internal processes such as earthquakes, plate tectonics volcanism, and societal impacts on natural resources. Collection and analysis of field and laboratory data using statistical, graphical, and critical thinking analysis. Prerequisite(s): MATH 120 . Offered fall of even years.
  
  • GEOL 410 - Field Studies

    (0-3)
    Off-campus field study opportunities led by department faculty, often occurring during the summer, winter or spring breaks. Topical studies will vary according to time and locations of the course. Prerequisites will vary according to the topic; credit will vary according to the length and complexity of the course.
  
  • GEOL 491 - Individual Study

    (1-6)
    Geologic research or in-depth study of a topic not normally available through other courses.
  
  • GEOL 493 - Selected Topics

    (3)
    Periodic course topics of timely interest to students. Credit and prerequisites will vary according to the topic.
  
  • GEOL 495 - Geology Internship

    (1-6)
    An opportunity for advanced students to look at careers in geology. Requires a written proposal, an off-campus adviser and permission of the department chair.

German

  
  • GER 110 - Elementary German I

    (4)
    Study of the German language as a means of communication through development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Sound and pronunciation rules; acquisition and application of basic grammatical rules. Customs and current trends in the German culture. Offered fall semester on a three-year rotation.
  
  • GER 111 - Elementary German II

    (4)
    Continuation of techniques used in GER 110  for development of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Daily practice of communication and application of basic grammatical rules. Contemporary German culture. Topics covered: daily routines, houses and apartments, housework, occupations and transportation. Offered spring semester on a three-year rotation. Prerequisite(s): GER 110  or placement exam.
  
  • GER 191 - Individual Study

    (1-4)
    Intended for majors and minors who wish to study material not covered by a regularly offered course. May not be repeated more than once without permission of department. Prerequisite(s): Permission of department chair.
  
  • GER 291 - Individual Study

    (1-4)
    Intended for majors and minors who wish to study material not covered by a regularly offered course. May not be repeated more than once without permission of department. Prerequisite(s): Permission of department chair.

Health and Sports Science

  
  • HSPTS 101 - Basic Physical Education Activity

    (1)
    These courses provide students with skill development and information on history, rules, etiquette, and terminology in a variety of individual/team sports, recreational and lifetime leisure pursuits, and fitness activities. Credit is not granted for repetition of an activity at the same level of instruction. Students are responsible for transportation or any related costs.  (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  • HSPTS 131 - Community Health

    (2)
    A study of community health including needs, problems, issues, and solutions. Preparation for recruiting community organizations, resource people, and potential participants for support and assistance in health education program planning and implementation. Coordinate the provision of health education services while serving as a community resource person.  (Offered every third semester.)
  
  • HSPTS 132 - Personal Health

    (4)
    Designed to establish a basis for positive health and health education. Evaluate and select valid sources of information about health needs and interests for individuals. Apply various processes in the acquisition of resource materials including computer usage.  (Offered as needed.)
  
  • HSPTS 133 - Health and Sexuality

    (4)
    Explores current issues in sexuality including AIDS/HIV, other sexually transmitted diseases and the promotion of sexual health.  (Offered fall-even years.)
  
  • HSPTS 134 - Personal Health

    (4)
    (UC 100 Cognate Course)  Designed to establish a basis for positive health and health education. Evaluate and select valid sources of information about health needs and interests for individuals. Apply various processes in the acquisition of resource materials including computer usage. Prerequisite(s): Fulfills University First Year Seminar Requirement.
  
  • HSPTS 155 - Officiating Sports

    (2)
    Knowledge, techniques and mechanics of officiating required for certification in selected sports. Elective.  (Offered every third semester.)
  
  • HSPTS 160 - First Aid and CPR

    (1)
    This course is designed to prepare students to be First Aiders, covering the topics of first aid, health care provider, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, immobilization and transport of emergency injuries.
  
  • HSPTS 161 - Orthopedic Taping, Wrapping, Bracing, Casting & Padding

    (2)
    This is a two credit course in which the student has the opportunity to develop knowledge and proficiency in the techniques and methods of the immediate care of common sports injuries. This course is a requirement for all Athletic Training and Athletic Training Pre-Physical Therapy Majors.  This class facilitates learning of the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective skills required to effectively tape, wrap, brace, cast and pad healthy individuals.  (Offered spring.)
  
  • HSPTS 190 - Sport Studies Series

    (1)
    Topical studies related to sports to include: nutritional concerns for the physically active of all ages.  (Offered as needed.)
  
  • HSPTS 193 - Selected Topics

    (3)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  • HSPTS 230 - Human Nutrition

    (3)


    An introductory exploration of the principles of nutrition. The course will examine the use of nutrients to support health, the nutritional needs throughout the life cycle, diet therapy, and current issues in nutritional supplementation.  (Offered every semester.)

      Prerequisite(s): None.

  
  • HSPTS 254 - Soph Clinical Instruction I

    (2)
    Supervised clinical instruction in an athletic training setting accompanied by the completion of weekly clinical proficiencies in basic taping and emergency procedures, which reflect clinical progression in the athletic training professional preparation program. (Offered fall.)
  
  • HSPTS 255 - Soph Clinical Instruction II

    (2)
    Supervised clinical instruction in an athletic training setting accompanied by the completion of weekly clinical proficiencies in vital sign assessment and anatomical landmark recognition, which reflect clinical progression in the athletic training professional preparation program. (Offered spring.)
  
  • HSPTS 260 - Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries

    (4)
    Care and prevention is a four credit hour course in which the student has the opportunity to develop knowledge of and proficiency in the techniques and methods of the care and prevention of the athletic injuries. This course is a requirement for all athletic training majors. In this class students are introduced to concepts involved in athletic training which include but are not limited to; human anatomy, injury assessments, emergency management, CPR and AED training, equipment care and fitting, and basic rehabilitation techniques.  (Offered fall.)
  
  • HSPTS 261 - Sport Injury Care and Management

    (4)
    This course is an introduction to sports injury and emergency care for non-health care profession students. (Offered spring.)
  
  • HSPTS 270 - Motor Learning: Concepts and Applications

    (2)
    Students will gain an understanding of how individuals initiate, control, and terminate movement and how behavioral and neural processes can influence movement control.  (Offered fall.)
  
  • HSPTS 280 - Exercise Tests and Measurements

    (2)
    Methods of testing and measurement techniques used in health and physical education. Establish a realistic scope of evaluation efforts and develop an inventory of existing valid and reliable tests and survey instruments. Analyze resulting evaluation data. (Offered spring.)
  
  • HSPTS 289 - Applied Human Anatomy

    (2)
    This course examines the relationship between joint and muscle function of the human body. Emphasis will be placed on bone, soft tissues, and joint structure and function, with applications to the basic principles underlying human movement.  (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  • HSPTS 293 - Selected Topics

    (1-4)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  • HSPTS 333 - Public Health & Epideminology

    (3)
    Explore social, economic, environmental and cultural influences on public health issues facing the Nation in the 21st Century.  Emphasizes an interdisciplinary health team approach and innovative population-based strategies that foster and support healthier communities.  Prerequisite(s): Must be a Junior or Senior level student. Prerequisite(s): Must be a Junior or Senior level student.
  
  • HSPTS 340 - Principles of Weight Training and Conditioning

    (4)
    This is an advanced strength and conditioning course designed to provide students with in-depth knowledge of proper strength training, performance enhancement, functional training, program design and conditioning techniques to be applied to various populations. This course will also provide basic facility management instruction. The topics will be covered through lecture, labs and other audio/visual aids.  (Offered spring.)
  
  • HSPTS 342 - Exercise Prescription

    (2)
    Examines the designing and implementation of individual and group exercise and fitness programs for apparently healthy individuals, individuals at high risk and those with known disease.  (Offered fall.) Prerequisite(s): BIOL 231  BIOL 232 ;
  
  • HSPTS 350 - Principles of Coaching

    (2)
    Basic principles for the development of interscholastic teams in individual and team sports. Not open to freshmen.  (Offered every third semester.)
  
  • HSPTS 352 - Coaching Methods

    (2)
    A series of courses devoted to the administration, organization and teaching techniques for coaching interscholastic teams in selected sports. Not open to freshmen.  (Offered every third semester.)
  
  • HSPTS 354 - Junior Clinical Instruction I

    (2)
    Supervised clinical instruction in an athletic training setting accompanied by the completion of weekly clinical proficiencies in the evaluation of the lower and upper extremity injuries, which reflect clinical progression in the athletic training professional preparation program. (Offered fall.) Prerequisite(s): HSPTS 382  and HSPTS 383  or permission of instructor.
  
  • HSPTS 355 - Junior Clinical Instruction II

    (2)
    Supervised clinical instruction in an athletic training setting accompanied by the completion of weekly clinical proficiencies in therapeutic modality usage, which reflect clinical progression in the athletic training professional preparation program. (Offered spring.) Prerequisite(s): HSPTS 386  or permission of instructor.
  
  • HSPTS 357 - Junior Practicum in Exercise Science

    (2)
    This course is a practicum for exercise sciences majors to gain experience working one-on-one with individuals/clients and/or groups to assess fitness levels, establish health goals, and design and monitor the progress of strength and conditioning programs.  (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  • HSPTS 362 - Biomechanics

    (4)
    Biomechanics is a lecture/discussion based class combined with hands-on, laboratory work. In this class, students are introduced to the concepts of mechanical and anatomical principles and their relationship with human movement.  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): BIOL 231 , BIOL 232 , HSPTS 289 .
  
  • HSPTS 364 - Physiology of Exercise

    (4)
    This course will examine the primary human physiological systems and their response to acute and chronic exercise stimuli. Physiological topics that will be covered include: muscle, nerve, hormonal, cardiovascular and respiratory physiology. Acute and chronic adaptations to exercise stimuli that will be covered include: cardiorespiratory responses, aerobic and anaerobic training adaptations and thermoregulatory responses. Exercise for special populations will also be considered.  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): BIOL 231 ; BIOL 232 ;  .
  
  • HSPTS 382 - Athletic Training Practices I

    (4)
    Program development relative to the practices of athletic training and techniques of prevention, evaluation, and management of injuries and illnesses of the trunk and lower extremities common to athletics.  (Offered fall.)
  
  • HSPTS 383 - Athletic Training Practices II

    (4)
    Program development relative to the practices of athletic training and techniques of prevention, evaluation, and management of injuries and illnesses of the head, neck and upper extremities common to athletics. Sequence course to follow HSPTS 382 .  (Offered spring.)
  
  • HSPTS 384 - Medical Aspects of Athletic Training

    (2)
    This course is a two credit hour course which information is presented on a variety of illnesses and conditions that may affect the athlete. In addition, the student will be introduced to pharmacologic applications, including awareness of the indications, contraindications, precautions and interactions of medications and of the governing regulations relevant to the treatment of injuries to and illnesses of athletes and others involved in physical activity that the entry-level certified athletic trainer must possess.  (Offered spring-odd years.) Prerequisite(s): Must be a junior or senior level student.
  
  • HSPTS 385 - Therapeutic Rehabilitation

    (4)
    This course is a four credit hour course providing a knowledge base and skill development in therapeutic exercise and preventing musculoskeletal injuries.  (Offered spring.) Prerequisite(s): HSPTS 260  or  .
  
  • HSPTS 386 - Therapeutic Modalities

    (4)
    Therapeutic Modalities is a four credit hour course in which the student has the opportunity to develop a knowledge of and proficiency in the theory, practice of the techniques and methods of modalities which are used in the treatment and care of athletic injuries.  (Offered fall.) Prerequisite(s): HSPTS 260  or  
  
  • HSPTS 393 - Selected Topics

    (1-3)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  • HSPTS 410 - Health Promotion

    (4)
    This capstone course will assist future health educators in planning, implementing and evaluating health promotion programs. This course will include direct practicum in a community setting implementing aspects of a health promotion program and focusing or service learning.  (Offered fall-odd years.) Prerequisite(s):   or HSPTS 134 .
  
  • HSPTS 450 - Administration of Athletic Training Programs

    (3)
    Development of Organizational, Managerial and Administrative skills necessary for administering a comprehensive athletic training program.  (Offered spring-even years.) Prerequisite(s): HSPTS 260 .
  
  • HSPTS 454 - Senior Clinical Instruction I

    (2)
    Supervised clinical instruction in an athletic training setting accompanied by the completion of weekly clinical proficiencies in therapeutic exercise, which reflect clinical progression in the athletic training professional preparation program.(Offered fall.) Prerequisite(s): HSPTS 385  or permission of instructor. 
  
  • HSPTS 455 - Senior Clinical Instruction II

    (2)
    A required 1 - 4 credit hour supervised clinical instruction in an athletic training setting accompanied by the completion of weekly clinical proficiencies which reflect clinical progression in the athletic training professional preparation program. (Offered spring.) Prerequisite(s): HSPTS 454  or permission of instructor.
  
  • HSPTS 488 - Senior Seminar: Athletic Training

    (1)
    An advanced course which examines current topics in health and sport sciences.(Offered fall.)
  
  • HSPTS 490 - Senior Colloquium and Practicum

    (4)
    This capstone senior year experience is designed to examine clinical settings and to synthesize Exercise Science knowledge necessary to work at this setting. This course will utilize two formats: seminar and supervised clinical practice. Through these experiences, the student will integrate knowledge form the liberal arts and exercise science to client issues, utilize critical thinking in the provision of competent client care; and demonstrate self-direction by developing and fulfilling a learning agreement in both the seminar and clinical experience. This course includes theory and clinical laboratory application.(Offered fall and spring.)
  
  • HSPTS 491 - Individual Study

    (1-6)
  
  • HSPTS 493 - Selected Topics

    (1-3)
  
  • HSPTS 495 - Internship

    (1-10)
    Internship in appropriate area (Coaching, Athletic Training, Health Fitness, Exercise Science, Pre-Physical Therapy). Credit Hours related to hours spent on internship. Permission of Instructor Required.

History

  
  • HIST 100 - World Civilizations: Ancient to 1500

    (4)
    This course explores human civilizations from a comparative, global perspective, starting with the Ancient World and ending with the Age of Exploration, analyzing civilizations in Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas. The emphasis is on the development of religion, trade, migration, government, the arts, technology and learning.  (Offered fall.)
  
  • HIST 101 - World Civilizations: 1500 to the Present

    (4)
    This course examines the development of European, Asian, African civilizations from the Age of Exploration to the present. The emphasis is on social and political history and focuses on the formation of the global market, cultural and technological change, the evolution of colonialism, imperialism, and nationalism, and the growth of mass societies.  (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  • HIST 120 - History of The United States: Colonial to 1877

    (4)
    The political, constitutional, economic, social and multicultural developments, from the Colonial era to the end of Reconstruction. (Offered fall.)
  
  • HIST 121 - History of The United States: 1877 to the Present

    (4)
    The political, constitutional, economic, social and multicultural developments in the United States from the end of the Reconstruction Era to the present. (Offered spring.)
  
  • HIST 193 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 4)
    Selected topics offered as needed.
  
  • HIST 220 - History of Africa

    (4)
    An analysis of continuity and change in African societies.  Topics include the slave trade, colonialism, nationalism, and contemporary economic and political development. (Same course offered as CLS 220 .)  (Offered fall.)
  
  • HIST 236 - History of the Modern Middle East

    (4)
    Survey of Islamic civilization from the time of Mohammed to 1914, including the development of Islamic social and cultural institutions. Also analyzes the political, economic and diplomatic developments since 1914, including the Israeli/Palestinian struggle, Iraq, and United States Middle East policies.  (Offered spring.)
  
  • HIST 260 - African American History and Culture

    (4)
    The study of African American life with emphasis on the African heritage, the emergence of African American culture, slavery, Civil War, Reconstruction, patterns of segregation, urbanization and 20th century cultural, political, social and economic patterns of protest and change. (Same course offered as CLS 260 .)  (Offered spring.)
  
  • HIST 265 - Ethnic Patterns in American History

    (4)
    A social and political history of the evolution of multicultural America with emphasis on the experiences of Native Americans, African Americans, Irish and Russian Immigrants, Latinos, and the so-called “New Immigrants.”
  
  • HIST 293 - Selected Topics

    (1-4)
    Selected topics offered as needed.
  
  • HIST 305 - Civil War and Reconstruction

    (4)
    A study of the bloodiest civil conflict in United States history.  Topics include the debate on slavery, secession, military strategies and leaders, major civil war battles, and Reconstruction. (Offered spring-even years.)
  
  • HIST 310 - Ohio History

    (4)
    A study of the geographical, political, social and cultural importance of Ohio in its relationship to American life and culture from the prehistoric era to the present.  (Offered fall-even years.)
  
  • HIST 315 - Sport and Society in U. S. History

    (4)
    A study of the development and role of sports in American social history with emphasis on the cultural, religious and economic patterns in the growth of organized amateur and professional sports. (Offered fall-even years.)
  
  • HIST 321 - The Vietnam War and the 1960s

    (4)
    Examination of key political, military and diplomatic dimensions of the Vietnam War in the context of economic and cultural developments in the United States during the 1960s. (Offered spring-odd years.)
  
  • HIST 325 - History of Modern China

    (4)
    Historical background of modern China, impact of the West, collapse of the Imperial Dynasty, the Republican era, and the Communist Revolution. The focus will be on political institutions, and social, cultural and intellectual change. (Same course offered as Political Science 325.)  (Offered spring.)
  
  • HIST 331 - Ancient Civilizations

    (4)
    Political, social and cultural survey of the ancient Near East, Egypt, Greece and Rome. (Offered fall.)
  
  • HIST 332 - Medieval Mediterranean Civilizations: Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Continuity and Conflict

    (4)
    This course introduces the history of the Mediterranean from the disintegration of the Roman Empire in the fourth and fifth centuries through the fall of Constantinople in the fifteenth century. Together, we will discuss the dissolution of the Greco-Roman world into the Medieval Latin West, the Byzantine, Empire, and the Islamic world. This course will also examine how these three civilizations continue to shape cultural, religions, and social structures of the modern world. 
  
  • HIST 335 - American Foreign Policy and Diplomacy

    (3)
    An analysis of the history, development and current patterns of American foreign policy and diplomacy with emphasis on America’s emergence as a world power, linkages between domestic and foreign policy, the decision-making process and the challenges of global interdependence. (Same course offered as POLS 335 .)  (Offered spring.)
  
  • HIST 370 - Women in U.S. History

    (4)
    Survey of women’s historical experiences in the United States from the colonial era to the present. The course includes an analysis of the methodology of studying women’s history and the role of women in the political, social, cultural and economic life of the United States. (Same course offered as CLS 370 .)  (Offered fall.)
  
  • HIST 385 - Russian/Soviet History

    (4)
    Political, social and cultural development of Russia from its origins to the present. (Same course offered as POLS 385 .)  (Offered spring.)
  
  • HIST 393 - Selected Topics

    (4)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  • HIST 393 - Selected Topics

    (1-4)
    Selected topics offered as needed.
  
  • HIST 395 - Doing Digital History

    (4)
    This course examines the impact of new media on the discipline of history. In order to help students become knowledgeable practitioners of the Digital Humanities, this course has the following aims: to introduce and discuss the positives and negatives of new media for the discipline of history; to evaluate the latest scholarship about new media; to familiarize the student with digital resources; to construct a historical project using digital sources and new media. (Offered spring, even years)
  
  • HIST 470 - Seminar

    (4)
    The study of historiography and historical methodology through extensive reading, research and writing in a particular field of history.  (Offered fall.) Prerequisite(s): HIST 100 HIST 101 HIST 120 ,HIST 121  and 3 additional History courses.
  
  • HIST 491 - Individual Study

    (1-4)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  • HIST 493 - Selected Topics

    (4)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  • HIST 495 - Internship

    (1-15)
    Qualified students may apply to intern with the Ohio Historical Society, The Washington Center, museums, archives or historic preservation organizations.  (Offered as needed.)

Honors

  
  • HONS 305 - Honors Capstone Experience Proposal

    (2)
    This course prepares students for the Honors Capstone Experience. During this course students develop a proposal that outlines an advanced piece of scholarship that goes above and beyond the expectations currently outlined within the student’s departmental major.  Students also will choose a faculty advisor to assist in the development of the scholarly project. Scholarly projects may include traditional theses or original creative projects (recitals, industry analyses, books, etc.). Prerequisite(s): Selection of advisor and permission of the Director of Honors and Undergraduate Scholarship.
  
  • HONS 405 - Honors Capstone Experience

    (2)
    This course follows the Honors Capstone Experience Proposal. During this course, students carry out the proposed scholarly activity developed in Honors 305. Students are required to present this scholarship to a wider audience at Capital’s Symposium on Undergraduate Scholarship or an alternative conference approved by the faculty advisor and the Director of Honors and Undergraduate Scholarship. Prerequisite(s):   and permission of the Director of Honors and Undergraduate Scholarship.

Interdisciplinary Studies

  
  • IDS 310 - Interdisciplinary Studies Seminar

    (4)
    Required for all Interdisciplinary Majors. Students will plan an academic course of action to match their professional and personal goals. Through class dialogue, out of class reading and writing assignments, use of on-line research materials, and experiential learning activities students will explore the nature of an interdisciplinary, self-designed major. They will: 1) learn to integrate prior learning as part of their interdisciplinary major; 2) explore the scholarly thesis process, 3) develop their degree plan of action and 4) examine ways of receiving experiential credit. Students will also gain a deepened appreciation for critical reflection and thinking, a sense of fair-mindedness that is grounded in academic integrity, and a value for intellectual humility.   Prerequisite(s): Transfer credit with permission of instructor. 
  
  • IDS 380 - Exploring Human Experiences:(Hope Forgiveness Compassion Courage Happiness Beauty Meaning and Truth)

    (3)
    Through interdisciplinary perspectives this course will explore one of the following focused areas during the length of a semester: hope, forgiveness, compassion, courage, happiness, generosity, meaning, and truth. Endemic to human experience these topics will engage students in various learning modalities. Class discussions, scholarly readings, and research assignments are designed to deepen self-reflection and awareness. Musical playlists, artistic expressions, empirical research projects, critical reading and writing, and a required abstract for submission to the Undergraduate Scholarship Symposium are hallmarks of this course. Two lead faculty guide the course with assistance from other faculty members in such disciplines as art therapy, business, music, nursing, religion and philosophy, psychology, and social work. Offered spring and fall semesters. Prerequisite(s):   or ENGL 111 Academic Composition , sophomore standing, or permission of the lead instructors. 
  
  • IDS 399 - Interdisciplinary Studies Research Methods

    (4)


     

    This course provides the foundation for research design, methodology, data collection, and presentation of results required of scholarly inquiry required of the senior thesis. Students will develop the ability to systematically collect, analyze, and interpret data in order to understand the specific phenomenon they are studying. They will continue to enhance their understanding of the quantitative and qualitative methods used in today’s research. Statistical analysis and data review techniques will be explored. From these students will select the best method to us as they develop the research design and proposal for their final thesis. Prerequisite(s):

     .

  
  • IDS 491 - Independent Study

    (1-8)
  
  • IDS 493 - Selected Topics

    (1-4)
    Periodic course topics of timely interest to students. Credit and prerequisites will vary according to the topic.
 

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