May 28, 2023  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

Course Descriptions


 

Computer Science

  
  •  

    CS 410 - iOS App Development

    (3)


    An introduction to iOS application development with an emphasis on software design patterns such as inheritance, model-view-controller, and delegation. The Swift programming language and standard frameworks for iOS development are used to develop small iOS applications. Offered Spring of Odd Years.

      Prerequisite(s): CS 340 , CS 361  or permission of instructor.

  
  
  •  

    CS 471 - Automata/Formal Languages

    (3)
    Formal language theory including languages, grammars, regular expressions, finite automata, pushdown automata and Turing theory. Prerequisite(s): CS 161 , CS 200 . Offered when there is sufficient demand.
  
  •  

    CS 478 - Computer Networks

    (3)
    Local and wide area networking including: protocols, standards, media, topologies, layered networking models, hardware and software. Offered fall semester in odd years. Prerequisite(s): CS 161 .
  
  •  

    CS 481 - Seminar

    (1)
    Oral presentations and written reports by students on topics not covered in the curriculum; presentations by students doing research; lectures by visiting professionals and the faculty. This course is repeatable up to 4 credits. Open only to junior and senior mathematics majors or by special permission.  Offered fall and spring semester.
  
  •  

    CS 491 - Individual Study

    (1-3)
    Intended for those students who wish to study an area of computer science not included in a regular course. Prior approval by the supervising professor must be secured before registration.
  
  •  

    CS 493 - Selected Topics

    (3)
  
  •  

    CS 495 - Internship

    (1-4)
    Computer science majors with junior or senior standing, with at least 30 hours completed at Capital, and a minimum grade point average of 3.0 overall and in major, may be assigned as interns to participating organizations and work under the supervision of a sponsor and faculty member.  All interns and internships must have the prior approval of the department. Repeatable to a maximum of 4 hours. Graded Pass/Fail.

Criminology

  
  •  

    CRIM 200 - Seminar I - Ethics

    (1)
    An introduction to ethical issues in the field of criminology, including selected topics in criminal justice, law enforcement, the courts, corrections, crime control policies and research. Attendance at departmental colloquia required. This course is graded Pass/Fail. (Offered spring.)
  
  •  

    CRIM 230 - Principles of Criminology

    (4)
    An introduction to the field of criminology including the nature, extent and variations in crime, theories of crime causation and crime typologies. Emphasis is placed on understanding criminal behavior as opposed to an examination of the criminal justice system. (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): SOC 120 .
  
  •  

    CRIM 301 - Seminar II - Career Planning

    (1)
    Preparation for graduate training and criminology careers. Students will learn about application to graduate school and law school, the G.R.E. and LSAT tests, and develop a graduate study and/or career plan. Attendance at departmental colloquia required. This course is graded Pass/Fail. (Offered as needed.)
  
  •  

    CRIM 340 - The Criminal Justice System

    (4)
    A study of the criminal justice system and the agencies responsible for detecting, prosecuting and adjudicating offenders, including defining crime and examining the history of criminal law with a focus on the role of the U.S. Constitution.  (Offered fall.) Prerequisite(s): SOC 120 CRIM 230 .
  
  •  

    CRIM 350 - Juvenile Justice

    (4)
    A study of the juvenile justice system in the United States including classical and contemporary theories of causation, institutionalization, diversion and prevention strategies. This course includes community engaged learning. (Offered spring.) Prerequisite(s):  SOC 120 CRIM 230 .
  
  •  

    CRIM 380 - Victimology

    (4)
    An introduction to the multifaceted issue of victimization in the U.S. and abroad including theories of victimization, trends in criminal victimization, treatment of victims in the criminal justice system, victim support issues, and the victimization of certain subgroups in the population. Guest speakers and victimization study projects may be utilized.  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): SOC 120 ; CRIM 230  or SOC 330 .
  
  •  

    CRIM 420 - White Collar Crime

    (4)
    This course is the study of deviance and illegal acts committed by respected persons, corporations, and organizations. Emphasis is placed on understanding the resulting social harm as well as the theories and research used to analyze these acts. (Offered spring.) Prerequisite(s):  SOC 120 ; CRIM 230  and junior standing.
  
  •  

    CRIM 491 - Individual Study

    (1-4)
    Individual, independent study with a faculty mentor.  (Offered as needed.)
  
  •  

    CRIM 493 - Selected Topics

    (1-4)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  •  

    CRIM 495 - Internship

    (1-4)
    Supervised field experience in a criminological setting accompanied by relevant library research and reflective writing. This course is graded Pass/Fail. Repeatable up to 8 hours.  (Offered as needed.)
  
  •  

    CRIM 499 - Undergraduate Criminology Thesis

    (4)
    Independent student scholarship usually comprising a comprehensive literature review, design and completion of criminological research, and a written and oral presentation of findings.  (Offered as needed.)

Cultural Studies

  
  •  

    CLS 220 - History of Africa

    (4)
    An analysis of continuity and change in African societies. Topics include the slave trade, colonialism, nationalism, and contemporary economic and political development. (Same course offered as HIST 220 .)
  
  •  

    CLS 227 - Diversity in a Global Society

    (4)
    Influence of family structure and function, cultural heritage, religious affiliation, social class, health and economic resources on generalist social work practice with diverse populations. (Same course offered as SWK 227 .)
  
  •  

    CLS 250 - Native American Religions

    (3)
    This course will explore the complexity and variety of Native American religious traditions with an emphasis on the historical impact of colonization upon those traditions. (Same course offered as RELIG 250 .)
  
  •  

    CLS 251 - Communication and Culture

    (3)
    The study of the purposes of language, relationship between communication and culture, including dialect and levels of usage and analyses of communication within and between specific cultures. (Same course offered as COMM 251 .)
  
  •  

    CLS 253 - Communication and Gender

    (3)
    The purpose of this course is to provide a foundation for students’ understanding of the complex relationships between communication and gender at the interpersonal, institutional, and societal levels. (Same course offered as COMM 253 .)
  
  •  

    CLS 260 - African - American History and Culture

    (4)
    The study of African American life with emphasis on the African heritage, the emergence of African American culture, slavery, Civil War, Reconstruction, patterns of segregation, urbanization and 20th century cultural, political, social and economic patterns of protest and change. (Same course offered as HIST 260 .)
  
  •  

    CLS 270 - Ethnic and Women’s Literature

    (4)
    The course provides an intensive study of the literature of ethnic and women writers in the United States within historical, social and cultural contexts.  We will investigate the roots of prejudice against marginalized groups, including women, and the power dynamics of the struggle for inclusion and equal representation that continues in our time.  Key works by significant Native American, African American, Latino/a and women writers, primarily from the 20th and early 21st centuries, will include fiction, poetry and nonfiction. (Same course offered as ENGL 270  and HIST 265 .)
  
  •  

    CLS 275 - Native American Literature and Culture

    (4)
    The course provides a study of oral and written literatures of Native Americans, emphasizing the writing of men and women from the last half of the 20th century. Works are presented in their historical and cultural contexts. (Same course offered as ENGL 275 .)
  
  •  

    CLS 310 - Sociology of Sex and Gender

    (4)
    An introduction to issues related to sex and gender, including social constructions of gender throughout history, gender socialization, sex and gender roles, gender identity, gender and the law, and language and media. (Same course offered as SOC 310 .) Prerequisite(s): SOC 120 ;
  
  •  

    CLS 341 - Gender and Film

    (3)
    Students will examine how film reflects, reinforces and redefines cultural assumptions about masculinity and femininity. Students will watch and, using theoretical perspectives discussed in class, analyze selected films. (Same course offered as  .)
  
  •  

    CLS 365 - Gender Politics

    (3)
    A study of how ideas about gender shape political relations and of how political relations shape ideas about gender. (Same course offered as POLS 365 .) Prerequisite(s): POLS 105 
  
  •  

    CLS 368 - African American Literature

    (4)
    An intensive study of African-American writers, male and female, of the 1920s to 1960s. This course analyzes key writers leading up to and included in the Harlem Renaissance and then traces the development of the Black Arts Movement. Fulfills the General Education Cultural Pluralism goal. Same course offered as ENGL 368 . (Offered as needed.)
  
  •  

    CLS 370 - Women in U.S. History

    (4)
    Survey of women’s historical experiences in the United States from the colonial era to the present. The course includes an analysis of the methodology of studying women’s history and the role of women in the political, social, cultural and economic life of the nation. (Same course offered as HIST 370 .)
  
  •  

    CLS 393 - Selected Topics

    (1-6)
  
  •  

    CLS 426 - Women Writers in the Hispanic Tradition

    (4)
    Texts in Spanish authored by women during the 16th-19th centuries, plus selected theoretical works written in English. Each writer defined her relationship with Spain through varying degrees of identification and resistance; each was influenced by the linguistic and cultural heritage of Spain. Discussion of critical questions related to gender and sexuality. Taught in Spanish. (Same course offered as Span 425.) Prerequisite(s): SPAN 310  or SPAN 311 ; SPAN-320 SPAN 330 SPAN 331 SPAN 350 SPAN 355 SPAN 361 SPAN 360 SPAN 365 , SPAN-370, SPAN 400 SPAN 410 , SPAN-420.
  
  •  

    CLS 491 - Individual Study

    (1-6)
  
  •  

    CLS 495 - Internship

    (1-6)
    Required for Ethnic Studies, African American / African Studies, or Gender and Women’s Studies with a focus on each of the respective areas. This course is graded Pass/Fail.

Economics

  
  •  

    ECON 101 - Macroeconomic Principles

    (4)
    Study of national income accounting; major macroeconomic relationships; explaining and predicting changes in the economy; the relationship of the domestic and foreign economics; monetary and fiscal policy and the economic role of government. (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  •  

    ECON 115 - Microeconomic Principles

    (4)
    A study of the basic economic concepts and their applications to social problems; and the understanding of economic activities in firms, households, markets and the economy. (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  •  

    ECON 193 - Selected Topics

    (1-4)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  •  

    ECON 293 - Selected Topics

    (1-4)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  •  

    ECON 320 - Intermediate Microeconomic Theory and Practice

    (4)
    Studies ways in which resources are allocated to different firms and industries; theory of demand, production and pricing of commodities and productive resources under perfect and imperfect competition, firm interaction and game theory.  (Offered fall.) Prerequisite(s):    or higher.
  
  •  

    ECON 326 - Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory and Money

    (4)
    Considers macroeconomic and monetary theory, and the role of fiscal and monetary policy in the economy. National income accounting, economic fluctuations, determinants of economic growth, short-run and long-run macroeconomic models, the measurement of money, monetary institutions, monetary theory, role and effectiveness of monetary  and fiscal policy.  (Offered spring.) Prerequisite(s): ECON 101 Macroeconomic Principles   or higher.
  
  •  

    ECON 334 - Labor Economics and Industrial Relations

    (4)
    Application of micro- and macroeconomic theory to labor markets. Topics include the demand for labor, the employment decision of workers, and rationale for the effects of legislation, non-wage compensation, investments in education and training, productivity considerations, racial and gender discrimination, unions, and public sector labor markets.  (Offered as needed.) Prerequisite(s):  .
  
  •  

    ECON 337 - International Economics & Finance

    (4)
    Considers international trade and capital flows, and the markets in which they take place. International trade and finance theory, including the gains from trade, comparative advantage, theories of trade, tariffs, the balance of payments, international economic institutions, the determination of exchange rates, exchange rate forecasting, exchange rate policy, speculation, short-term investment, foreign direct investment and the Euro currency market.  (Offered fall-even years.) Prerequisite(s):   and  .
  
  •  

    ECON 340 - The Evolution of Economic Systems and Economic Thought

    (4)
    Examines the evolution of economic theory in the context of the evolution of economics systems from the 17th century to the modern day. The history of economic theory, reflections on ways of organizing society to carry out production and distribution of goods and services; comparison of capitalism, communism and socialism, and problems of their historical development.  (Offered fall-odd years.) Prerequisite(s):   and    (or higher).
  
  •  

    ECON 350 - Environmental Economics

    (4)
    An analysis of environmental problems and possible policy responses, such as command-and-control regulation and market-based solutions. Areas stressed include the ramifications of negative externalities and market failures, the economics of pollution control, the economics of sustainable development, environmental policy development, and global environmental issues. The use of analytical tools such as risk assessment, risk management, and benefit-cost analysis in environmental planning is explored. Includes three comprehensive case studies of major environmental problems and policy solutions.  (Offered spring-even years.) Prerequisite(s):  .
  
  •  

    ECON 361 - Public Finance

    (4)
    The economics of the public sector, including the impact of the government budget on resource allocation, income distribution and economic stabilization; principles and problems of budget determination, including both tax and expenditure aspects; tax shifting and incidence; and fiscal and debt-management policies.  (Offered spring-odd years.) Prerequisite(s):  
  
  •  

    ECON 393 - Selected Topics

    (1-4)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  •  

    ECON 491 - Individual Study

    (1-8)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  •  

    ECON 493 - Selected Topics

    (1-4)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  •  

    ECON 495 - Internship

    (1-8)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  •  

    ECON 499 - Senior Project

    (1-4)
    Independent student scholarship comprising a comprehensive literature review, design and implementation of economic research and a written and oral presentation of findings.  (Offered as needed.)

Education

  
  •  

    EDUC 100 - Preprofessional Services

    (0-3)
    This service learning opportunity engages teacher education students in professional development experiences in schools and other settings for up to forty (40) hours during a semester. Students learn through direct service to educators, children, families, and/or agencies. Faculty and students develop approved contracts for service in diverse settings. Elements of planning for and accomplishing individualized professional growth are addressed. Emphasis is on experiences that relate to “job embedded” professional growth. This course may be repeatable to 3 hours credit.  (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  •  

    EDUC 101 - Developing as a Professional Educator I

    (1)


    This course is a professional introduction to Capital University’s Teacher Education Program, required of all Education majors and Post-degree Ohio licensure candidates. The aim of the course is to introduce teacher education candidates to the broad context that surrounds the education profession. Education 101 will introduce students to the essential questions in P-12 education as seen through the eyes of professionals:

    • What broad contexts support the education profession?
    • What habits of mind and professional dispositions would it benefit an educator to develop and nurture?
    • What does it mean to do education research across academic disciplines?
    • What does an educator need to know about diverse communities of learners?
    • How may collaboration with key stakeholders and participation in online professional learning communities support professional development?  

    (Offered fall/spring) Corequisite(s): EDUC 151 Foundations of the Education Profession  

  
  •  

    EDUC 141 - Phonics for Student Learning

    (2)
    This course introduces orthographic and phonologic components of the English language and extends students knowledge of concepts, terminology, and teaching techniques related to phonics as a language, reading, and writing tool. Required for all Early Childhood, Middle Childhood, and Intervention Specialist Education majors. (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  •  

    EDUC 151 - Foundations of the Education Profession

    (3)
    (UC 100 Cognate Course)  Education 151 will introduce students to the education profession through exploration of two essential questions: What does it mean to be educated? What does it mean to choose education as a vocation? Students will reflect on their own experiences with education as they study its multiple historical, social, philosophical, ethical, and legal foundations and make connections with how these foundations influence current educational thought and practice. Students will develop an awareness of how diversity among learners, families, and communities contextualizes effective teaching, management of learning environments, and assessment of student learning. Professional development will be emphasized through students attending and reflecting on their choice of diverse and multidisciplinary campus-sponsored or community events. Fulfills University First Year Seminar Requirement.(First Year Seminar) (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): Placement in to UC 110  or ENGL 111 .
  
  •  

    EDUC 201 - Developing as a Professional Educator II

    (4)
    This course serves as an introduction to curriculum development (lesson, unit, and year planning), pedagogical approaches to teaching, assessment design, and reflective practice in order to prepare the students for the pedagogy field experience, student teaching, and in-service teaching. The course materials will focus on the many facets of the planning and teaching experience, which will assist students in understanding the organic nature of teaching and learning. (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  •  

    EDUC 211 - Foundations of Early Childhood Education

    (4)


    This course provides basic knowledge of the foundations of early childhood education. The course introduces students to the historical and socio-cultural forces that have impacted the field along with contemporary early childhood programs and models; theories of play and developmentally appropriate early childhood curriculum.  The course is linked to the field component of EDUC 201 and includes a case study analysis of developmental domains utilizing a variety of assessment techniques. (Offered fall/spring.)

     

      Prerequisite(s): EDUC 101  and EDUC 151 . Corequisite(s): EDUC 201 .

  
  •  

    EDUC 213 - Early Literacy and Literature for Children

    (4)
    This course prepares teacher education candidates to effectively select and incorporate high quality children’s literature in service of cross-curricular and literacy specific instruction.  Students are expected to read, apply, and otherwise utilize various genres of children’s literature and related media effectively in the classroom.  Extensive reading of and response to children’s literature from the perspective of early childhood and intervention specialist educators is required. (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  •  

    EDUC 214 - Integrating Learning Experiences: Art, Music, Drama and Movement

    (4)
    This integrated experience provides early childhood teacher education students with the current knowledge of and ability to develop and implement meaningful, integrated learning experiences, using the central concepts and tools of inquiry in the curriculum content areas of art, music, drama, and movement. This course is offered pass / fail only.  (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  •  

    EDUC 222 - Philosophy and Organization of Middle Schools

    (2)
    This course prepares teacher education students to understand the rationale for, the role of teachers in, and the function of interdisciplinary teams, teacher based guidance programs, flexible grouping and scheduling arrangements, activity programs, working with colleagues within the framework of the entire school community, and working with families, resource persons and community groups.  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): EDUC 151 ; PSYCH 120  or PSYCH 121 .
  
  •  

    EDUC 231 - Introduction to Exceptionalities and Interventions

    (4)
    This course is required for teacher education majors. The course focuses on understanding intervention strategies that are evidence-based when teaching all students particularly those students with exceptionalities and English Language Learners (ELLs). Lectures, readings, multimedia, field trips, and learning activities are structured to allow students to examine their disposition, knowledge, and skills related to teaching students with exceptionalities and ELLs. (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): EDUC 101  and EDUC 151 .
  
  •  

    EDUC 242 - Adolescent Literature and Literacies

    (4)
    This course exposes teacher education students to much of the literature currently being read by students in grades four through nine. They gain knowledge of current and historical perspectives about the nature and purposes of reading and about widely used approaches and instructional materials for reading instruction. The course requires extensive reading, covering many genres and authors of varied backgrounds.  (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  •  

    EDUC 283 - Intercultural Student Teaching and Community Engagement Seminar

    (2)
    The Intercultural Student Teaching and Community Engagement seminar serves as a preparatory phase for the Intercultural Student Teaching (IST) program, allowing pre-service candidates to prepare for professional and service learning experiences while student teaching overseas in one of the 18 countries.  The course aligns directly with several University initiatives: innovative educational programs, community engagement and service learning. Students participating in the IST program do a split placement, getting experience in both the United States and an overseas school placements. 
  
  •  

    EDUC 301 - Developing as a Professional Educator III

    (2)
    This course focuses on professional development through the use of case studies reflecting the professional skills of collaborating, adapting and differentiating instruction and assessment when working with students with linguistic, cultural and ability differences. Current Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession and federal law requirements will be guides for the applications of these skills, emphasizing the ability to define and defend effective teaching practices as they relate to student learning and achievement. Field hours required outside of class.  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): EDUC 101 EDUC 151 , and Junior Standing
  
  •  

    EDUC 309 - Inquiry Across the Curriculum

    (4)
    Inquiry across the Curriculum introduces and engages students in inquiry-based learning (IBL) and strategies.  Inquiry-based learning enhances student knowledge and engagement by helping students develop hands-on, minds-on skills that are increasingly necessary in the 21st century.  IBL prioritizes the knowledge and experience students bring to the classroom and it promotes active problem solving, learning through experience, communication results, and the shared construction of new ideas. (Offered Spring, Fall)
  
  •  

    EDUC 310 - Writing: Theory and Practice

    (4)
    Study of current theories of the writing process and their application to teaching written composition. The course includes the teaching and writing of different genres, reflection on student writing and assessment of student writing.  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): Junior standing.
  
  •  

    EDUC 312 - School, Family, and Community Partnerships

    (2)
    This course is required for teacher education majors. The course focuses on understanding intervention strategies that are evidence-based when teaching all students particularly those students with exceptionalities and English Language Learners (ELLs). Lectures, readings, multimedia, field trips, and learning activities are structured to allow students to examine their disposition, knowledge, and skills related to teaching students with exceptionalities and ELLs. Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): EDUC 101  and EDUC 151 ; Sophomore standing. Field work is required outside of class times.
  
  •  

    EDUC 315 - Mathematics: Integrated Learning Experiences

    (4)
    This course prepares the early childhood education teacher education candidates to teach mathematics to students in grades PK-3. Candidates are prepared to use manipulatives, calculators, and a variety of resource materials to plan mathematical tasks and activities appropriate for the diverse needs of students. The course prepares candidates to plan and implement lessons, with appropriate assessments that will stimulate students’ development of mathematical concepts and skills and that are based on the Common Core State Standards. Acceptance into Teacher Education Program is required to enroll in this course. This course includes extensive field experience.   Corequisite(s): EDUC 316  and EDUC 317  and EDUC 318 . (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  •  

    EDUC 316 - Reading and Language Arts: Integrated Learning Experiences

    (4)
    This 4 semester credit hour course prepares early childhood education and intervention specialist candidates to teach reading, writing, listening, visual literacy, and oral communications using appropriate instruction methods, learning activities, and materials based on the Ohio Academic Content Standards for English Language Arts, National English Language Arts standards., and Common Core English Language Arts Standards. Candidates learn to assess student learning and to collect and analyze data to evaluate student achievement as well as reflect on their own teaching. The course includes an intensive field experience. Acceptance into Teacher Education Program is required to enroll in this course. Corequisite(s):  EDUC 315  and EDUC 317  and EDUC 318 . (Offered Fall/Spring)
  
  •  

    EDUC 317 - Science: Integrated Learning Experiences

    (4)
    This course is designed to prepare the early childhood education teacher education candidates to teach science to students in grades PK-3. Candidates are prepared to plan activities and teach skills appropriate for the diverse needs of their students. Attention is paid to exploring and developing knowledge about the natural world, promoting the curiosity of young children, meeting the challenges of inquiring minds through concepts in science. The course prepares candidates to plan and implement lessons, with appropriate assessments, that will stimulate students’ development of science concepts and skills and that are based on state and national standards. The course includes an intensive field experience. Acceptance into Teacher Education Program is required to enroll in this course. Corequisite(s): EDUC 315  and EDUC 316  and EDUC 318 .
  
  •  

    EDUC 318 - Social Studies: Integrated Learning Experiences

    (4)
    This course is designed to prepare the early childhood education teacher education candidates to teach social studies to students in grades PK-3. Candidates are prepared to plan activities and teach skills appropriate for the diverse needs of their students. Attention is paid to becoming better citizens, exploring our global connections, both as individuals and learning communities. The course prepares candidates to plan and implement lessons, with appropriate assessments, that will stimulate students’ development of social studies concepts and skills and that are based on state and national standards. Students must have been admitted into Teacher Education Program to enroll in this course. This course includes extensive field experience. Corequisite(s): EDUC 315  and EDUC 316  and EDUC 317 
  
  •  

    EDUC 350 - Issues in Second Language Acquisition: Theory and Practice

    (2)


    This course emphasizes language teaching theory and methodology as well as creation of instructional, analytical, and evaluative materials for the TEFL classroom.  It is designed to cover: history, development and current theories of second language acquisition; variables affecting second language learning, including cross-cultural issues; and terminology associated with the many aspects of TEFL.  The course is designed for TEFL, second/foreign language and content-area teachers as well as other professionals interested in effective language teaching. (Offered fall / spring)

     

  
  •  

    EDUC 352 - Language Arts Pedagogy for Middle Childhood

    (2)
    This course is designed to prepare middle childhood education candidates to teach language arts to students in grades 4-9. The course prepares candidates to teach reading, writing, listening/visual literacy, and oral communications using appropriate instructional methods, learning activities and materials based on the Common Core Standards for English Language Arts and National Council of Teachers of English standards. Candidates also learn to assess student outcomes and to collect and analyze data to evaluate student achievement as well as reflect on their own teaching. The course includes an intensive field experience.  (Offered fall / spring.) Prerequisite(s): Admittance into Teacher Education Program. Corequisite(s): Corequisite exception for MCE Generalist, only.
  
  •  

    EDUC 353 - Mathematics Pedagogy for Middle Childhood

    (2)
    This course prepares middle school and adolescent to young adult teacher education candidates to teach mathematics to students in grades 4-9. Candidates are prepared to use a variety of resource materials to plan mathematical tasks and activities appropriate for the diverse needs of students. The course prepares candidates to plan lessons, with appropriate assessments, that will stimulate students’ development of mathematical concepts and skills and that are based on the Common Core State Standards. This course includes extensive field experience.  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): Admittance into Teacher Education Program.
  
  •  

    EDUC 354 - Science Pedagogy for Middle Childhood

    (2)
    Recent research on the pedagogy of teaching science to middle childhood will be discussed. Science teaching topics include: constructivism, inquiry, event-based, and daily life experiences.  Science teaching topics include misconceptions, safety, and legal concerns. Students will design and implement inquiry and technology based lessons using the Ohio’s Learning Standards and the National Science Education Standards. Students must pass all areas of Science Teaching Exit Portfolio including a science teacher statement.  (Offered spring/summer.) Prerequisite(s): Admittance into the Teacher Education Program.
  
  •  

    EDUC 355 - Social Studies Pedagogy for Middle Childhood

    (2)
    This course prepares middle school and adolescent to young adult teacher education candidates to teach social studies to students in grades 4-9. Candidates are prepared to plan tasks and activities appropriate for the diverse needs of their students. Attention is paid to becoming better citizens, exploring our global connections, both as individuals and learning communities. The course prepares candidates to plan and implement lessons, with appropriate assessments, that will stimulate students’ development of social studies concepts and skills and that are based Ohio Academic Content Standards and the National Social Studies Standards. This course includes extensive field experience.  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): Admittance into the Teacher Education Program.
  
  •  

    EDUC 356 - Language Arts Pedagogy for Adolescents to Young Adults

    (2)
    This course is designed to prepare adolescent to young adult education candidates to teach language arts to students in grades 7-12. The course prepares candidates to teach reading, writing, listening/visual literacy, and oral communications using appropriate instructional methods, learning activities, and materials based on the Common Core Standards for English Language Arts and National Council of Teachers of English Standards. Candidates also learn to assess student outcomes and to collect and analyze data to evaluate student achievement as well as reflect on their own teaching. The course includes an intensive supervised field experience.  (Offered fall.) Prerequisite(s): Admittance into the Teacher Education Program. Corequisite(s): EDUC 352 
  
  •  

    EDUC 357 - Mathematics Pedagogy for Adolescents to Young Adults

    (2)
    This course prepares middle school and adolescent to young adult teacher education candidates to teach mathematics to students in grades 7-12. Candidates are prepared to use manipulatives, graphing calculators, and a variety of resource materials to plan mathematical tasks and activities appropriate for the diverse needs of students. The course prepares candidates to plan and implement lessons, with appropriate assessments that will stimulate students’ development of mathematical concepts and skills and that are based the Common Core State Standards. This course includes extensive field experience.  (Offered fall.) Prerequisite(s): Admittance into the Teacher Education Program. Corequisite(s): EDUC 353 .
  
  •  

    EDUC 358 - Science Pedagogy for Adolescents to Young Adults

    (2)
    Recent research on the pedagogy of teaching science to adolescents and young adults will be discussed. Students will design lessons that include science instructional strategies such as inquiry, integration of technology, laboratory, and field-based experiments using the Ohio Academic Content Standards and the National Science Education Standards. Students must pass all areas of Science Teaching Exit Portfolio.  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): Admittance into the Teacher Education Program. Corequisite(s): EDUC 354 .
  
  •  

    EDUC 359 - Social Studies Pedagogy for Adolescents to Young Adults

    (2)
    This course prepares middle school and adolescent to young adult teacher education candidates to teach social studies to students in grades 7-12. Candidates are prepared to plan tasks and activities appropriate for the diverse needs of their students. Attention is paid to becoming better citizens, exploring our global connections, both as individuals and learning communities. The course prepares candidates to plan and implement lessons, with appropriate assessments that will stimulate students’ development of social studies concepts and skills and that are based on Ohio Academic Content Standards and the National Social Studies Standards. This course includes extensive field experience.  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): Admittance into the Teacher Education Program. Corequisite(s): EDUC 355 .
  
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    EDUC 363 - Pedagogy for Early and Middle Childhood Vocal Music Programs

    (3)
    This course is designed to prepare multi-age music teacher education candidates to teach vocal music to children and young adolescents, pre-kindergarten through grade 6. Attention is given to the role music plays in the ways students construct knowledge and acquire skills; preparing candidates to employ multiple strategies and opportunities for active student engagement in learning music; and developing an understanding that independent thinking, creativity and self expression are fostered by a quality music education. Candidates are prepared to design, guide, adapt and modify experiences in which learners with different skill levels, backgrounds, learning and performance styles and disabilities are engaged and can achieve. Attention is given to identifying and designing appropriate learning experiences for oneself as a teacher that are aligned with state and national standards.  (Offered fall.) Prerequisite(s): Admittance into the Teacher Education Program.
  
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    EDUC 365 - Visual Arts Pedagogy for Early and Middle Childhood Education

    (3)
    This course is designed to prepare multi-age visual arts teacher education candidates to teach visual arts to children; young adolescents; and young adults-pre-kindergarten through grade 12. Candidates are prepared to design and employ multiple opportunities for actively engaging students in learning art; encouraging students to assume responsibility for their own learning; and create, adapt and modify learning experiences and lessons, based on students needs and changing circumstances. Candidates are prepared to design varied strategies and procedures for motivation and assessment that considers art production, history, criticism and individual growth and development. This course is to be taken with EDUC 369 .  (Offered fall.) Prerequisite(s): Admittance into the Teacher Education Program.
  
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    EDUC 367 - Pedagogy for Instrumental Music Programs

    (3)
    This course is designed to prepare multi-age music teacher education candidates to teach instrumental music to young adolescents through young adults. Attention is given to the role music plays in the ways students construct knowledge and acquire skills; preparing candidates to employ multiple strategies and opportunities for active student engagement in learning music; and developing an understanding that independent thinking, creativity and self expression are fostered by a quality music education. Attention is given to identifying and designing appropriate learning experiences for oneself as a teacher that are aligned with state and national standards.  (Offered spring semester.) Prerequisite(s): Admittance into the Teacher Education Program.
  
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    EDUC 369 - Visual Arts Pedagogy for Adolescents to Young Adults

    (3)
    This course is designed to prepare multi-age visual arts teacher education candidates to teach visual arts to students from adolescent to young adult, grades pre-K through 12. Attention is given to designing, assisting and practicing instruction in a meaningful field experience context with a master cooperating teacher and preparing a variety of authentic assessment responses that will be useful in making instructional and managerial decisions regarding extended aspects of teaching and learning in the visual arts. This course is to be taken with EDUC 365 .  (Offered fall.) Prerequisite(s): Admittance into the Teacher Education Program.
  
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    EDUC 371 - Reading for Learning

    (3)
    This course develops understanding and acceptance of the importance of reading as a means to learning, to accessing information, and to enhancing the quality of life. Students will come to recognize the importance of embedding reading instruction in a meaningful context for the purpose of accomplishing specific, authentic tasks. In addition, they will acquire strategies that are necessary for teaching content area reading. This course is for Music Education majors only.  (Offered spring.)
  
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    EDUC 373 - Assessment and Intervention: Literature, Phonics, and Alphabetic Principle

    (4)
    Education students will learn how to administer and score developmentally appropriate reading assessments for K-12 students. Included in the course will be running records/miscue analysis of grade leveled passages, early intervention tasks, analytic spelling tests, fluency measures, and comprehension assessment. These assessments results will be used to plan lessons that are focused on the strengths and needs of individual students K-12 and to provide evidence of reading achievement for individual students K-12. This course includes tutoring of children.  (Offered fall/spring/summer.) Prerequisite(s): EDUC 141 Phonics for Student Learning .
  
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    EDUC 374 - Content Area Reading

    (4)
    This course develops understanding and acceptance of the importance of reading to accessing information, comprehending written texts, and acquiring knowledge across academic disciplines. Students will come to recognize the importance of embedding reading instruction in a meaningful context for the purpose of accomplishing specific, authentic tasks. In addition, they will acquire specific teaching, learning, and study strategies that are necessary for teaching content area reading. Content Area Reading includes on site or school based clinical experiences.  (Offered fall/spring/summer.)
  
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    EDUC 381 - Diagnostic Teaching of Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities

    (4)
    This course prepares intervention specialist teacher education candidates to assess and instruct students with mild to moderate disabilities. Includes a clinical experience in an after-school tutoring program which may occurs outside of scheduled class time. Must take prior to student teaching.  Prerequisite(s): EDUC 201  and EDUC 231 . Field work is required outside of class time.  (Offered fall/spring/summer.)
  
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    EDUC 382 - Positive Behavior Intervention and Supports (PBIS)

    (4)
    This course prepares teacher education candidates to work with exceptional children with mild to moderate disabilities. A focus will be on children with emotional/behavioral disorders. Includes a field-based component with children with emotional and behavioral disabilities and the development of Functional Behavior Assessments and resulting Behavior Intervention Plans. Must take course prior to student teaching. Prerequisite(s):  EDUC 231 . (Offered fall/spring.)
  
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    EDUC 383 - Autism, Dyslexia and Writing Grants

    (2)
    This course is a special topics project-based course that is considered interdisciplinary and is offered for any students on campus, and especially in the departments of Social Work, Nursing, Art Therapy, Psychology and Education.  Students will investigate past and current research, the history of the topics, delve deeper into the characteristics and needs of students, as well as learn how to create their own questions to answer through their own self-generated research of literature.  
  
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    EDUC 401 - Developing As a Professional IV

    (2)
    This is the last course in a four course sequence designed to provide teacher education candidates with an ongoing awareness, exploration, commitment, development, and refinement of the knowledge, dispositions, and skills expected of entry year teachers in Ohio’s performance-based licensure program. Candidates develop an ongoing awareness, exploration, development, and refinement of the knowledge, dispositions, and skills expected of entry-year teachers found in the Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession, Ohio Teacher Evaluation System, and the edTPA. Candidates will understand and apply pedagogical principles and practices to: obtain high student achievement, positive expectations, effective classroom management, differentiated instruction and continuous development as a professional. Prerequisite(s): The passing of all required state licensure exams. Admittance to student teaching. 
  
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    EDUC 410 - Student Teaching: Early Childhood Education

    (10)
    Student Teaching is an intensive fifteen week experience in an appropriate school setting. The experience allows the candidate to demonstrate the knowledge, dispositions, and skills of the ten performance areas for entry year teachers in the State of Ohio under the direct supervision of school and university personnel. Candidates conduct ongoing reflection, analysis, and evaluation of the experience. Candidates in Early Childhood Education must complete experiences in two different settings, serving children of two different age groups with varying abilities.  Special Fee applies (see “SPECIAL FEES” in the FINANCE section of this Bulletin).  Prerequisite(s): The passing of all required state licensure exams. Admittance to student teaching. Corequisite(s): EDUC 401 .  (Offered fall/spring.)
  
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    EDUC 420 - Student Teaching: Middle School

    (10)
    Student Teaching is an intensive fifteen week experience in an appropriate school setting. The experience allows the candidate to demonstrate the knowledge, dispositions, and skills of the ten performance areas for entry year teachers in the State of Ohio under the direct supervision of school and university personnel. Candidates conduct ongoing reflection, analysis, and evaluation of the experience. Candidates in Middle Childhood Education must complete experiences in both areas of concentration during Student Teaching.  Special Fee applies (see “SPECIAL FEES” in the FINANCE section of this Bulletin). Prerequisite(s): The passing of all required licensure exams. Admittance to student teaching.  Corequisite(s): EDUC 401 . (Offered fall/spring.)
  
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    EDUC 430 - Student Teaching: Adolescent to Young Adult

    (10)
    Student Teaching is an intensive fifteen week experience in an appropriate school setting. The experience allows the candidate to demonstrate the knowledge, dispositions, and skills of the ten performance areas for entry year teachers in the State of Ohio under the direct supervision of school and university personnel. Candidates conduct ongoing reflection, analysis, and evaluation of the experience.  Special Fee applies (see “SPECIAL FEES” in the FINANCE section of this Bulletin).  Prerequisite(s): The passing of all required licensure exams. Admittance to student teaching.  Corequisite(s): EDUC 401 . (Offered fall/spring.)
  
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    EDUC 440 - Student Teaching: Multi-Age

    (10)
    Student Teaching in Art, Health and Physical Education is an intensive fourteen week experience in appropriate school settings. The experience allows the candidate to demonstrate the knowledge, dispositions, and skills of the ten performance areas for entry year teachers in the State of Ohio under the direct supervision of school and university personnel. Candidates in Multi-Age Education must complete experiences in two different settings, serving children of two different program levels. Special Fee applies (see “SPECIAL FEES” in the FINANCE section of this Bulletin). (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): The passing of all required licensure exams.  Admittance to student teaching. Corequisite(s): EDUC 401 . (Offered fall/spring)
  
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    EDUC 441 - Student Teaching Elementary Music Education

    (5)
    Student Teaching is an extensive twelve-week experience in an elementary/middle/secondary school music setting. Candidates conduct ongoing reflection, analysis, and evaluation of the experience.  Special Fee applies (see “SPECIAL FEES” in the FINANCE section of this Bulletin). (Offered fall/spring.)
  
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    EDUC 442 - Student Teaching Secondary Music Education

    (5)
    Student Teaching is an intensive twelve-week experience in an elementary/middle/secondary school music setting. Candidates conduct ongoing reflection, analysis, and evaluation of the experience. Special Fee applies (see “SPECIAL FEES” in the FINANCE section of this Bulletin). (Offered fall/spring.)
  
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    EDUC 450 - Student Teaching: Intervention Specialist

    (10)
    Student Teaching is an intensive experience in two appropriate school settings. The experience allows the candidate to demonstrate the knowledge, dispositions, and skills of the ten performance areas for entry year teachers in the State of Ohio under the direct supervision of school and university personnel. Candidates conduct ongoing reflection, analysis, and evaluation of the experience. Candidates in Intervention Specialist Education must complete experiences in two different settings, serving children of two different program levels of Mild/Moderate programs. Special Fee applies (see “SPECIAL FEES” in the FINANCE section of this Bulletin). Prerequisite(s): EDUC 381  and EDUC 382 . The passing of all required licensure exams.  Admittance to student teaching. Corequisite(s): EDUC 401 . (Offered fall/spring.)
  
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    EDUC 491 - Individual Study

    (1-6)
    (Offered as needed.)
 

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