Feb 25, 2024  
2021 - 2022 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2021 - 2022 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

Course Descriptions


 

Other Courses

  
  • NURS 328L - Nurs Adlts /Acute Hlth Lab II

    (0)
    Lab required to take with NURS-328.The focus of this course is nursing management of adults of all ages who are experiencing acute health alterations affecting multiple body systems.  Emphasis is on expanding and applying knowledge of health alterations for the purpose of helping adults achieve their optimum level of health. The course includes theory, laboratory practice and clinical practicum.  (Theory = 2 semester hours = 5.5 hours/week/7wks = 37.5 semester hours; Clinical 1.25 semester hours = 11 hours/week/7wks = 75 semester hours; Lab 0.25 semester hours = 1 hour/week/7 weeks = 7 semester hours; Total clinical/lab: 82 semester hours). Special Fee applies (see “Special Fees” in the “Financial” section of the undergraduate bulletin). 

American Sign Language

  
  • ASL 110 - Elementary American Sign Language I

    (4)
    This class is a survey of communication within the Deaf Community. As an introduction to American Sign Language (ASL), this class incorporates a series of visual readiness activities as a way of introducing students to and preparing them for a language in visual modality.  (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  • ASL 111 - Elementary American Sign Language II

    (4)
    Continuation of techniques used in ASL-110. This class is a survey of communication within the Deaf Community. As an introduction to American Sign Language (ASL), this class incorporates a series of visual readiness activities as a way of introducing students to and preparing them for a language in visual modality.  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): ASL 110  

Art

  
  • ART 120 - Foundations in Studio Art

    (4)
    Studio course in art appreciation. Studio problems include the basic techniques and media of the artist in drawing, painting, design and composition.  (Offered fall.)
  
  • ART 121 - Drawing

    (4)
    Laboratory course in the use of basic drawing media utilizing still life, portrait, figure and landscape. (Offered as needed.)
  
  • ART 124 - Introduction to Art Therapy

    (4)
    Overview of the field of art therapy and correlation with related professions. Course format is lecture, discussion, visual presentations and expressive arts experiences.  (Offered fall.)
  
  • ART 210 - Visual Art

    (3)
    Fulfills Fine Arts Signature Learning requirement. Provides students with learning experiences focusing on art as a form of organization and communication. The course includes historical aspects of art forms along with a major emphasis on practice in art.  (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  • ART 221 - Painting and Drawing

    (4)
    A laboratory course in the fundamentals of painting and drawing.(Offered as needed.)
  
  • ART 226 - Imagery and Metaphor

    (4)
    A study of metaphor as it applied to Art therapy, the process of creating therapeutic art, and the art product. Course format is lecture, discussion, visual presentations and expressive arts experiences.  Required for Art therapy majors and minors. (Offered as needed.) Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 120  or PSYCH 121 , ART 124  or approval of instructor.
  
  • ART 231 - Design

    (4)
    Elements of design related to both two and three dimensional problems, including studio experience in the symbolic function of lettering. (Offered as needed.)
  
  • ART 232 - Graphic Design

    (4)
    A studio introduction to the media, concepts, and techniques used by the commercial artist and designer in preparation of graphic art. (Offered as needed.)
  
  • ART 241 - Sculpture

    (4)
    Three-dimensional studio problems in modeling, molding, casting, carving and assembling. (Offered as needed.)
  
  • ART 251 - Ceramics

    (4)
    Execution of ceramic products by hand-building and potters wheel.  (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  • ART 264 - Digital Computer Imaging

    (4)
    An introduction to computer generated art with emphasis on creating images using digital cameras, scanners, and graphic development software.  (Offered fall / spring.)
  
  • ART 271 - Printmaking

    (4)
    Drawing and pictorial composition related to printing processes including etching, lithography, relief and calligraphy. (Offered as needed.)
  
  • ART 272 - Photography

    (4)
    An introductory course in the use of a 35mm. camera. Developing an awareness of photography as an art form through manipulation of a variety of laboratory techniques.  (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  • ART 293 - Selected Topics

    (1-6)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  • ART 325 - Assessment in Art Therapy

    (4)
    An introduction to assessing 2-D and 3-D therapeutic art and the application of observational and inference skills that are used in art therapy. Course format is lecture, discussion, visual presentations and expressive arts experiences. Course format is lecture, discussion, visual presentations and expressive arts experiences.  Required for Art therapy majors and minors.  (Offered as needed.) Prerequisite(s): ART 120  or ART 210 ; ART 226  or approval of instructor.
  
  • ART 327 - Art Therapy Techniques and Methods

    (4)
    An overview and research of creative arts techniques as they apply to diverse populations in a therapeutic setting. Course format is lecture, discussion, visual presentations and expressive arts experiences.  Required for Art therapy majors and minors .  (Offered as needed.) Prerequisite(s):  ART 120  and ART 226  or approval of instructor.
  
  • ART 393 - Selected Topics

    (1-4)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  • ART 422 - Life Drawing

    (4)
    Drawing and painting from the human figure, including concepts of color and composition.(Offered as needed.) Prerequisite(s): ART 120  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ART 423 - Advanced Topics in 2-D Studio Art

    (4)
    Advanced course that investigates various technical, aesthetic, and conceptual issues related to a two-dimensional studio art form. Rotating topics include but are not limited to Design, Painting, Photography, and Printmaking. Each course will consist of practical demonstrations, lectures on essential historic, theoretical, and technical information, presentations of historic and contemporary works within this art form, and class critiques.  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): Student needs to have received a “B” or better in beginning level course of demonstrated competency in specified art form.
  
  • ART 428 - Clinical Applications in Art Therapy

    (4)
    An academic study of the profession of art therapy as it interfaces with other professions within community and private settings. Course format is lecture, discussion, visual presentation, art experience and role play.  (Offered as needed.) Prerequisite(s): ART 325  or ART 327  and junior standing
  
  • ART 430 - Art Therapy Portfolio

    (1)
    Instruction in preparing a portfolio of visual arts, academic achievement and experience for application to graduate study or employment. Course format is discussion, visual presentations, application and interview.  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): ART 121 , ART 327 , ART 221  and ART 251  and junior standing.
  
  • ART 433 - Professional Practice

    (1)
    Completion, presentation and evaluation of a portfolio of visual arts, academic achievement and experience. Course format is demonstration, application, discussion, visual and oral presentations, interview, critique/analysis.  (Offered as needed.) Prerequisite(s): ART 233 .Junior standing.
  
  • ART 443 - Advanced Topics in 3-D Studio Art

    (4)
    Advanced course that investigates various technical, aesthetic, and conceptual issues related to a three-dimensional studio art form. Rotating topics include but are not limited to Sculpture, Ceramics, and Jewelry/Metal Design. Each course will consist of practical demonstrations, lectures on essential historic, theoretical, and technical information, presentations of historic and contemporary works within this art form, and class critiques.  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): Student needs to have received a “B” or better in beginning level course or demonstrated competency in specified art form.
  
  • ART 445 - Art Therapy Senior Project I

    (2)
    Design and undertake a senior project that takes the form of scholarly work upheld in the art therapy profession. The project is a culmination of the student’s interest, skill and knowledge about art therapy, and may result in research, program development, art performance or a service project. Required for Art therapy majors.  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s):   or   and Senior standing.
  
  • ART 446 - Art Therapy Senior Project II

    (2)
    This course is a continuation of  . Complete and disseminate a senior project that take the form of scholarly work upheld in the art therapy profession. The project is a culmination of the student’s interests, skill, and knowledge about art therapy, and may result in research, program development, art performance or a service project.  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s):  
  
  • ART 491 - Individual Study

    (1-6)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  • ART 493 - Selected Topics

    (1-6)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  • ART 495 - Internship

    (1-6)
    Arranged field placement with therapeutic arts provided in a community program. Course format is experiential application and discussion.  (Offered fall/spring.)

Art History

  
  • AH 293 - Selected Topics

    (3)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College.  Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  • AH 300 - Art History Survey I

    (3)
    Survey of Western visual art from prehistoric times to the Gothic period. Focuses on the art of Europe but also includes the Ancient Near East and the Byzantine Empire. Explores the cultural context in which works were created. (Offered as needed.)
  
  • AH 301 - Art History Survey II

    (3)
    Survey of Western visual art from the late Gothic period to the nineteenth century. Covers major artists and movements and explores the cultural context in which works were created. (Offered as needed.)
  
  • AH 312 - Modern and Contemporary Art History

    (3)
    Selected topics in Western visual art from the nineteenth century to the present. Focuses on the evolution of the Avant Garde. Explores a broad spectrum of work from painting, sculpture, and architecture to conceptual, performance, and process art.  (Offered as needed.)
  
  • AH 393 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 6)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College.  Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  • AH 415 - Asian Art History

    (3)
    Selected topics from the artistic traditions of India, China, and Japan. Explores historical, religious, and societal contexts in which works were created.  (Offered as needed.)
  
  • AH 491 - Individual Study

    (1-3)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  • AH 493 - Selected Topics

    (2-4)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  • AH 495 - Internship

    (3-6)
    Qualified students may apply to work with The Schumacher Gallery or related off-campus art institutions with approval of instructor.  (Offered fall/spring.)

Biology

  
  • BIOL 100 - General Biology

    (4)
    Natural Science Group B: Introductory study of the living system for non-science majors. Includes molecular/biochemical, cellular, organismal, and community level studies, and an introduction to the major unifying theories of the biological sciences. Laboratory investigations at all levels. Not applicable for a major in the biological sciences. Corequisite(s): BIOL-100L. Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
  • BIOL 110 - Introductory Workshop for Biological and Environmental Sciences Majors

    (1)
    An introduction seminar for Biological and Environmental Science students at Capital University. Learning goals include articulation of academic goals, academic study planning, skills for college success, faculty and advising resources, library research skills, and exposure to primary literature through written communication. Offered fall semester. Prerequisite(s): None.
  
  • BIOL 150 - Human and Applied Genetics

    (3)
    Natural Science Group A: The new genetics and the future of humans. Genetic principles will be developed to explain the many recent developments in applied genetics and human engineering. Not applicable for major in biological sciences except by permission. Offered spring semester.
  
  • BIOL 151 - Foundations Modern Biology I

    (4)
    Natural Science Group B: Introduction to the process of scientific investigation and to the theories and unifying concepts of the biological sciences, including biochemistry, cell biology, metabolism and growth, genetics and evolution. Relates theories to historical and contemporary technological and societal issues. Includes inquiry-based laboratory investigations. A foundational course for science majors and students considering science careers. Corequisite(s): BIOL-151L. Offered fall semester.
  
  • BIOL 152 - Foundations Modern Biology II

    (4)
    Continuation of BIOL 151 ; topics include kingdom diversity and an introduction to the study of botany and zoology. Studies include anatomy and physiology, behavior, diversity and ecology of organisms, including humans. Includes laboratory investigations in areas of botany, zoology and human biology. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151 . Corequisite(s): BIOL-152L. Offered spring semester.
  
  • BIOL 170 - Biology for Pre-Nursing

    (4)

    This course is a first level science course primarily for nursing majors. It is designed to help students understand the foundational theories on which the modern biological sciences are based (molecular/biochemical, cellular, genetic, and evolution), and set the stage for advanced biology courses such as Microbiology and Anatomy & Physiology.  (Nursing Majors: A passing grade in this course is a C (73 or above); a C- or below will not allow you to receive credit for this course. Offered fall and spring semesters. Corequisite(s): BIOL-170 Lab.

  
  • BIOL 193 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 4)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College. Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  • BIOL 200 - Sophomore Seminar

    (1)
    Exploration of career options and current trends in the Biological Sciences. Outside speakers and opportunities to visit with career professionals. Discussions of critical thinking skills and their applications in the sciences. Open to majors in the biological sciences with sophomore standing. Offered fall semester. Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing; Biological Science major.
  
  • BIOL 231 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I

    (4)
    An introduction to body components, their structure and function including: basic physiological and anatomical principles, osteology, myology and nervous control. Not applicable for major in biological sciences, except those in occupational therapy and physical therapy. Offered fall semester. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151  or BIOL 170 CHEM 172  or CHEM 150 ; or permission of instructor.  Corequisite(s): BIOL-231L.
  
  • BIOL 232 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II

    (4)
    Continuation of BIOL 231 ; the coordination of body functions with emphasis on respiration, circulation, digestion, reproduction and regulatory processes in the human. Not applicable for major in biological sciences, except those in occupational therapy and physical therapy. Offered spring semester. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 231 ; CHEM 172  or  . Corequisite(s): BIOL-232L.
  
  • BIOL 240 - Medical Terminology

    (2)
    A study of the technical language of medicine and the allied health fields. The Greek and Latin prefixes, roots and suffixes with which to construct medical terms. Includes both written and spoken language, a study of abbreviations and acronyms used in medicine and a look at patient charts. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 151 Foundations Modern Biology I  or BIOL 170 Biology for Pre-Nursing .
  
  • BIOL 270 - Genetics

    (4)
    Mechanisms of inheritance, nature of gene expression at chromosomal and molecular levels, transmission of genes in populations and individuals, and evolution at the molecular level. Studies include human, lower animal and plant genetics. Applications of mathematics and statistics to outcome prediction. Relates underlying theory to contemporary societal issues such as genetic engineering, gene therapy and cloning. Includes inquiry-based laboratory investigations. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 152 CHEM 172 ; MATH 121  or higher. Corequisite(s): BIOL-270L. Offered fall semester.
  
  • BIOL 280 - General Microbiology/Immunology

    (4)
    The role of microorganisms, primarily bacteria and viruses, in biological processes. Emphasis on human disease and immunity. Includes two, 2-hour labs weekly involving pure culture techniques and biochemical actions of microorganisms. Not applicable for major in biology. Offered fall and summer semeseters. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 170  along with   or CHEM 171  and CHEM 172 , or permission of instructor.  Corequisite(s): BIOL-280L. 
  
  • BIOL 290 - Principles of Microbiology

    (4)
    The life cycles of prokaryotic organisms, including cell structure, genetics, growth and development. Technological developments in microbial engineering and understanding of human and environmental disease. Includes some inquiry-based laboratory investigations. Offered spring semester. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 152 , CHEM 172 . Corequisite(s): BIOL-290L.
  
  • BIOL 293 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 4)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College.  Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  • BIOL 300 - Junior Seminar

    (1)
    A seminar in bioethics and career development, including preparation of a portfolio in preparation for graduate school or the job market. Required of Biology and Environmental Sciences majors in their third year. Offered spring semester. Prerequisite(s): Must be a biological sciences major and junior standing. 
  
  • BIOL 315 - Research Methods

    (3)
    An introduction to the techniques and practices of biological and environmental science research focusing on experimental design, critical literature review, data analysis, and scientific writing and dissemination of research in poster form. (Same course offered as ENVS 315 .) Offered fall and spring semester. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 152 Foundations Modern Biology II .
  
  • BIOL 320 - Conservation Biology

    (3)
    Study of biological diversity and its value, threats to biodiversity, conservation at population and species levels, environmental ethics, extinction, protecting, managing and restoring ecosystems, and landscape ecology.  Students will develop specific skills, competencies, and points of view needed by conservation biologists by analyzing, interpreting, and presenting scientific information, critically examining case studies and reading peer-reviewed literature, and writing a grant proposal. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 152 Foundations Modern Biology II .
  
  • BIOL 324 - Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

    (4)
    A comprehensive investigation of the anatomy of representative vertebrates, including humans, at the level of general body form from phylogenetic and embryonic development. Evolution of vertebrate circulatory, respiratory, urinary, digestive, nervous, and reproductive systems are covered relative to ecology of species/classes. Application of current biological theories of development and evolution is intertwined with examination of physical form and fossil records to highlight the role of natural selection in vertebrate evolution. Offered fall semester. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 152 . Corequisite(s): BIOL-324L.
  
  • BIOL 334 - Vertebrate Physiology

    (4)
    A detailed study of the cellular and systemic processes involved in vertebrates, including humans. The relationship of form and function in the animal body is covered, centering on the human organism as the primary model. Laboratory investigations of function using both human and other vertebrate organisms. Offered spring semester. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 324 , CHEM 172 . Corequisite(s): BIOL-334L. 
  
  • BIOL 360 - Ecology

    (4)
    Principles and concepts of ecosystems, including structure, energy flow, limiting factors, productivity, population diversity, behavior and interactions between species. Applications of mathematical and statistical principles to field data. Includes laboratory investigations and field trips. Offered fall semester. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 152 ; MATH 121  or higher. Corequisite(s): BIOL-360L.
  
  • BIOL 380 - Endocrinology

    (3)
    A study of the anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, development, and diseases of the mammalian endocrine system. Structure, function, and biochemistry of the reproductive and metabolic hormones. Includes discussion of nutritional and environmental factors known to alter hormone secretion and/or function, and examples of human endocrine related diseases. (Offered every other year.) Prerequisite(s): BIOL 152 . Offered fall of even years.
  
  • BIOL 393 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 4)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College.  Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  • BIOL 400 - Senior Seminar

    (1)
    A seminar in current problems and methods in biology. Student participation in research and oral presentations. Offered fall only. Prerequisite(s): Must be a biological sciences major and have senior standing.
  
  • BIOL 401 - Embryology and Development Biology

    (4)
    Embryonic processes involved in formation of the vertebrate body plan, emphasizing physical and biochemical aspects in the development of vertebrate body systems. Laboratory-comparative embryology of metazoan body systems. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 324 ; Offered spring of even years.
  
  • BIOL 410 - Field Studies

    (0-3)
    Off-site field study opportunities led by department faculty, often occurring during the summer, winter, or spring breaks. Topical studies will vary according to time and location of the course. Prerequisites will vary according to the topic; credit will vary according to the length and depth of the course.
  
  • BIOL 430 - Histology

    (4)
    A study of distinctive microscopic features of cells and tissues, with emphasis on the relationship between microscopic structure and function. Includes laboratory analysis of cells and tissue sections. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 324  or permission of instructor. Offered spring of odd years.
  
  • BIOL 452 - Cell and Molecular Biology

    (4)
    Examination of intracellular mechanisms of cell function and molecular processes involving macromolecules. Laboratory includes manipulation of genetic elements, labeled antibody techniques and cell culture experiments. Offered spring semester. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 270 . Corequisite(s): BIOL-452L.
  
  • BIOL 460 - Fundamentals of Immunology

    (3)
    A study of the anatomy, physiology and biochemistry of the mammalian immune system, with emphasis on the role of the human system in health and disease. Offered fall of even years. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 290 CHEM 172 .
  
  • BIOL 470 - Molecular Genetics and Biotechnology

    (3)
    A study of the molecular aspects of genetic material, and the application of molecular genetic knowledge in contemporary society. Topics include regulation of gene expression, transcriptional and translational processes, gene experimentation, forensics, genetic screening for human disease, and other biotechnological uses of genetic information. Includes discussion of bioethical issues as they relate to genetics. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 270 .
  
  • BIOL 491 - Individual Study

    (1-6)
    Biological research or in-depth study of a topic not normally available through other courses. For junior and senior students only. Requires a written proposal, a faculty adviser, and permission of the department chair.
  
  • BIOL 493 - Selected Topics

    (1-6)
    Periodic course topics of timely interest to students. Credit and prerequisites will vary according to the topic. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 152  
  
  • BIOL 495 - Internship

    (1-6)
    An opportunity for advanced students to try a career in the biological sciences. Requires a written proposal, an off-campus adviser and permission of the department chair.

Business

  
  • BUS 101 - Introduction to Business

    (4)
    An introduction to the fundamental principles of business, emphasizing the interrelatedness of the various business functions (accounting, economics, finance, operations, human resource management, and marketing). Students will obtain a better understanding of business news and current events as well as the basics of financial markets. Students will obtain and demonstrate basic proficiency in Microsoft Office (Word, PowerPoint,Excel). Open only to first year business majors or non-business majors of any class standing. Must successfully complete BUS-101 with a C- or better to progress. (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  • BUS 131 - Principles of Marketing

    (4)
    A general survey of marketing. Focus will be on building profitable customer relationships in the marketing environment and applying the marketing mix (product, pricing, promotion and place/distribution).  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): Must achieve a C- or better in BUS 101 Introduction to Business 
  
  • BUS 193 - Selected Topics

    (1-3)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  • BUS 201 - Professional Development

    (2)
    Development of effective business writing and oral communication skills for the business environment, including: business correspondence, presentation skills and the use of electronic media.  Preparation of resumes, cover letters, and thank you letters will be covered as well as interviewing skills.  The role of career planning, personal financial planning and development skills, including budgets and credit scores, in professional career development will be covered. (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): ENGL 111 Academic Composition  or UC 110 Reading and Writing in College  and Sophomore standing.
  
  • BUS 210 - Personal Finance

    (3)
    Planning and personal financial goals with sound financial principles such as budgeting and intelligent money management, insurance applications, real estate applications, investment knowledge, and tax applications.  Does not count toward major.  Prerequisite(s): None.
  
  • BUS 211 - Financial Accounting Fundamentals

    (4)
    A study of the framework of generally accepted accounting principles including: the accounting cycle, the income statement, balance sheet, statement of cash flows and financial statement analysis. Not open to first year students. (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): MATH 120 College Algebra .
  
  • BUS 212 - Accounting for Managers

    (4)
    Elective course creating foundational familiarity with financial and managerial concepts used in everyday business. The process of the accounting cycle, revenue recognition, inventory and profit concepts are explored through creation of public financial statements for manufacturing and service firms. Students will gain recognition of business and ethical dilemmas in accounting and solve common business problems using internal controls, ratio analysis, cost-volume-profit analysis, decision analysis and the comprehensive budget process. (Business majors and minors are not eligible to take this course.)
  
  • BUS 213 - Introduction to Managerial Accounting

    (2)
    Managerial Accounting covers four essential tasks of: cost determination, cost control, performance evaluation and supplying financial information for managerial planning and decision-making. (Offered fall / spring.) Prerequisite(s): BUS 211 .
  
  • BUS 221 - Management Information Systems with Excel & Access Applications

    (4)
    This course is an exploration and in-depth look at how today’s businesses utilizes information technology (IT) and information systems (IS) to achieve corporate objectives. Students will learn how to use Microsoft Excel and Access as data management  tools in business.  This will include learning the functionality and application of these tools. (Offered fall / spring, 2018) Prerequisite(s): BUS 101 
  
  • BUS 240 - Finance

    (4)
    Students will develop an understanding of basic financial tools and apply them in preliminary financial analysis and decision making.  The course covers financial statement analysis, time value of money, risk and return, capital budgeting techniques, cash flow estimation, asset valuation and financial planning and forecasting.  Not recommended before the second semester of the sophomore year.  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): BUS 211 Financial Accounting Fundamentals ; MATH 215 Elementary Statistics .
  
  • BUS 242 - Organizational Behavior

    (4)
    This course presents students with a comprehensive overview of organizational behavior and its evolution.  Topics discussed include understanding the context in which organizations function, individual differences and motivation, goal setting, groups and teams, leadership, and organizational processes such as decision-making and communication.  The changing workforce and the globalization of business organizations are stressed throughout.  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
  
  • BUS 243 - Human Resource Management

    (2)
    Survey of the philosophies, theories and principles of administering human resources; problems and practices of line and staff executives in managing the recruitment selection, development, maintenance and utilization of a well-working force.  (Offered fall.) Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
  
  • BUS 246 - Business Law

    (2)
    The legal environment in which business transactions are conducted; basic concepts and fundamentals of contracts, tort law, and property law.  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): Not recommended for first years.
  
  • BUS 260 - International Business

    (4)
    An overview of the field of international business.  The course is designed to familiarize the undergraduate student with the environments facing international businesses and the challenges associated with any organization operating globally.  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): BUS 101 .
  
  • BUS 293 - Selected Topics

    (1-3)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College.  Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level. (Offered as needed)
  
  • BUS 295 - Accounting Externship

    (1)
    Opportunity for qualified and selected students to shadow accounting professionals on a full-time basis for four days.  Externs typically will be exposed to audit, tax, corporate, and governmental accounting. (Offered as needed.) Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor and sophomore standing.  Graded P/F.
  
  • BUS 311 - Intermediate Accounting I

    (4)
    An intensive study and application of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) for asset and liability valuation, income measurement, and financial statement presentation for business organizations. Topics include the conceptual framework, the accounting cycle, plant assets, leases, income tax accounting, pensions, and compound interest techniques. This course relies extensively on the case method of instruction and utilizes the Business Activity Model (BAM) simulation.  (Offered fall.) Prerequisite(s): BUS 211 BUS 213 .
  
  • BUS 312 - Intermediate Accounting II

    (4)
    An intensive study and application of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) for asset and liability valuation, income measurement, and financial statement presentation for business organizations. Topics include cash and receivables, inventories, intangible assets, investments, long-term debt, shareholders’ equity, and earnings per share. This course relies extensively on the case method of instruction and utilizes the Business Activity Model (BAM) simulation.  (Offered spring.) Prerequisite(s): BUS 311 .
  
  • BUS 315 - Entrepreneurship

    (4)
    Students will understand and develop the leadership essentials that provide the fundamental skills for both starting a business and operating a small or family business enterprise. (Offered spring.) Prerequisite(s): Junior standing. 
  
  • BUS 322 - Corporate Finance

    (4)
    This course familiarizes students with the core concepts and theory of corporate finance and helps students develop an analytical framework for understanding how organizations make investment and financing decisions. The emphasis will be on applications of corporate finance theory to the real world as well as an understanding of the limitations of the tools in practical settings. Specific topics include asset valuation, capital budgeting, cost of capital, capital structure, dividend policy, working capital management and financial planning and forecasting.  (Offered fall.) Prerequisite(s): BUS 240 .
  
  • BUS 325 - Business Ethics

    (2)
    Students will learn about leadership, ethics, accountability and developing their leadership potential.  A substantial portion of the variation in organizational outcomes can be attributed to the ethics of the leader.  As such, this course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of ethical leadership as a phenomenon and its impact on the organizational behavior of individuals.  Students will learn to think critically about ethical leadership, the boundary conditions of leadership and accountability.  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): Junior standing.
  
  • BUS 327 - Financial Institutions, Markets, and Risks

    (4)
    This course provides an overview of financial instruments, markets, and institutions with an emphasis on the structure of the financial services industry and its role in supplying funds to the money and capital markets. The course also examines the management of risks in wide range of financial activities, with a particular focus on market risk, credit risk and liquidity risk. (Offered spring) Prerequisite(s): BUS 240  or ECON 101 .
  
  • BUS 333 - Consumer Research & Strategy

    (5)
    An examination of consumer behavior concepts, qualitative research and marketing strategy. Students will complete a focus group research project, conduct a situational analysis, and develop a targeted marketing plan for a local company. These three reports can be used to build the student’s marketing portfolio. (Offered fall/spring) Prerequisite(s): BUS 131 .
  
  • BUS 335 - Promotional Planning & Metrics

    (5)
    An exploration of the Integrated Marketing and Communication process and the promotional techniques available to marketing management professionals. Students gain an understanding of market research, consumer behavior analysis, advertising, sales promotion, digital/social media, and publicity as components of overall marketing strategy. (Offered fall/spring) Prerequisite(s): BUS 131  or permission of instructor.
  
  • BUS 337 - Digital Marketing

    (4)
    This course prepares students with a foundational understanding of digital marketing channels and how successful marketing campaigns leverage online and mobile marketing tools and tactics available.  Students will learn the fundamentals of digital marketing including digital marketing strategy, search engine optimization (SEO), social media and content marketing, digital advertising (paid search, display, paid social), email marketing, user experience (UX) and conversion optimization, and digital marketing analytics, as well as how to construct digital marketing campaigns. (Offered fall) Prerequisite(s): BUS 335  
  
  • BUS 343 - Advanced Human Resource Management

    (4)
    Advanced topics in human resource management, including: staffing, total rewards, training and development, international challenges in managing human resources, ethical issues, and the role of technology. Emphasis is placed on the strategic role of human resource management in organizational effectiveness. (Offered spring.) Prerequisite(s): BUS 242 ,BUS 243 .
  
  • BUS 347 - Business Law II

    (2)
    A continuation of Business Law I, with special emphasis on the Uniform Commercial Code; business organizations, including trusts; bankruptcy, and securities, environmental and employment laws.  (Offered spring.) Prerequisite(s): BUS 246 .
 

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