Mar 04, 2024  
2021 - 2022 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2021 - 2022 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

Course Descriptions


 

Education

  
  • EDUC 410 - Student Teaching: Early Childhood Education

    (4 - 8)
    Student Teaching is an intensive fifteen week experience in an appropriate school setting. The experience allows the candidate to demonstrate the knowledge, dispositions, and skills of the ten performance areas for entry year teachers in the State of Ohio under the direct supervision of school and university personnel. Candidates conduct ongoing reflection, analysis, and evaluation of the experience. Candidates in Early Childhood Education must complete experiences in two different settings, serving children of two different age groups with varying abilities.  Special Fee applies (see “SPECIAL FEES” in the FINANCE section of this Bulletin). (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): The passing of all required state licensure exams. Admittance to student teaching. Corequisite(s): EDUC 401 .  
  
  • EDUC 420 - Student Teaching: Middle School

    (4 - 8)
    Student Teaching is an intensive fifteen week experience in an appropriate school setting. The experience allows the candidate to demonstrate the knowledge, dispositions, and skills of the ten performance areas for entry year teachers in the State of Ohio under the direct supervision of school and university personnel. Candidates conduct ongoing reflection, analysis, and evaluation of the experience. Candidates in Middle Childhood Education must complete experiences in both areas of concentration during Student Teaching.  Special Fee applies (see “SPECIAL FEES” in the FINANCE section of this Bulletin). Prerequisite(s): The passing of all required licensure exams. Admittance to student teaching.  Corequisite(s): EDUC 401 . (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  • EDUC 430 - Student Teaching: Adolescent to Young Adult

    (4 - 8)
    Student Teaching is an intensive fifteen week experience in an appropriate school setting. The experience allows the candidate to demonstrate the knowledge, dispositions, and skills of the ten performance areas for entry year teachers in the State of Ohio under the direct supervision of school and university personnel. Candidates conduct ongoing reflection, analysis, and evaluation of the experience.  Special Fee applies (see “SPECIAL FEES” in the FINANCE section of this Bulletin).  Prerequisite(s): The passing of all required licensure exams. Admittance to student teaching.  Corequisite(s): EDUC 401 . (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  • EDUC 440 - Student Teaching: Multi-Age

    (4 - 8)
    Student Teaching in Art, Health and Physical Education is an intensive ffifteenourteen week experience in appropriate school settings. The experience allows the candidate to demonstrate the knowledge, dispositions, and skills of the ten performance areas for entry year teachers in the State of Ohio under the direct supervision of school and university personnel. Candidates in Multi-Age Education must complete experiences in two different settings, serving children of two different program levels. Special Fee applies (see “SPECIAL FEES” in the FINANCE section of this Bulletin). (Offered fall/spring.)  Prerequisite(s): The passing of all required licensure exams.  Admittance to student teaching. Corequisite(s): EDUC 401 
  
  • EDUC 441 - Student Teaching Elementary Music Education

    (4)
    Student Teaching is an extensive half-semester experience in an elementary/middle/secondary school music setting. Candidates conduct ongoing reflection, analysis, and evaluation of the experience.  Special Fee applies (see “SPECIAL FEES” in the FINANCE section of this Bulletin). (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  • EDUC 442 - Student Teaching Secondary Music Education

    (4)
    Student Teaching is an intensive twelve-week experience in an elementary/middle/secondary school music setting. Candidates conduct ongoing reflection, analysis, and evaluation of the experience. Special Fee applies (see “SPECIAL FEES” in the FINANCE section of this Bulletin). (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  • EDUC 450 - Student Teaching: Intervention Specialist

    (4 - 8)
    Student Teaching is an intensive experience in two appropriate school settings. The experience allows the candidate to demonstrate the knowledge, dispositions, and skills of the ten performance areas for entry year teachers in the State of Ohio under the direct supervision of school and university personnel. Candidates conduct ongoing reflection, analysis, and evaluation of the experience. Candidates in Intervention Specialist Education must complete experiences in two different settings, serving children of two different program levels of Mild/Moderate programs. Special Fee applies (see “SPECIAL FEES” in the FINANCE section of this Bulletin). Prerequisite(s): EDUC 381  and EDUC 382 . The passing of all required licensure exams.  Admittance to student teaching. Corequisite(s): EDUC 401 . (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  • EDUC 491 - Individual Study

    (1-6)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  • EDUC 493 - Selected Topics

    (1-12)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College.  Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  • EDUC 495 - Internship

    (1-12)
    The internship program allows the student to become a co-teacher in a public school for an entire school year calendar. The intern receives a stipend and is under contract to the public school system. Students who wish to intern must carefully plan their program from the initial stages of their college experience in order to have course work completed prior to the internship. A student’s student teaching experience is a component of the internship.  (Offered as needed.)

Film and Media Production

  
  • FMP 100 - Pre-Professional Studies

    (0-3)
    Experiential learning opportunity within radio, television or film. Repeatable for a maximum of six hours.  (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  • FMP 138 - Media & the Creative Process

    (3)
    Media and the Creative Process is designed to give all FMP students a vocabulary and a base-level of experience in a variety of creative fields (sound design, layout design, video shooting/editing, script writing, digital drawing and animation).  With a common experience and a common language, EMF/FMP students will be better prepared to collaborate on a deeper level as they matriculate through their EMF/FMP courses and their careers in Film and Media. (Offered fall.)
  
  • FMP 193 - Selected Topics

    (1-6)
    Repeatable under different topics.  (Offered as needed.)
  
  • FMP 210 - The Art of Cinema

    (3)


    This course will introduce the art and technology of cinema, exploring the variety of the film experience and the ways of viewing. Students will learn about the basic cinematic techniques and structures, including mise-en-scene, use of cinematography, editing, sound, story, and the distinct language that film uses. Students will also create a micro-short using techniques learning in this course. Film examples from prominent directors, such as Spielberg, Hitchcock, Tarantino, Fincher, etc. will be screened in class. This is a Signature Learning class that meets the Fine Arts requirement. (Offered every semester.)

      Prerequisite(s): None.

  
  • FMP 232 - Media Writing

    (3)
    Learn basic principles, structure and format for screenwriting, copy writing, and social media writing. Includes film, television, radio, commercial and social media scripts and stories. (Offered fall.) Prerequisite(s): MDIA 102 .
  
  • FMP 293 - Selected Topics

    (1-6)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College.  Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level. (Offered as needed.)
  
  • FMP 300 - Advanced Pre-Professional Studies

    (0-3)
    Advanced experiential learning opportunity within radio, television or film. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 hours. (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): FMP 100  
  
  • FMP 331 - Color Grading

    (2)
     Advanced study and focus of color grading with an emphasis on DaVinci Resolve, RAW footage, and Color Grading control surfaces. (Offered every other Spring.)
  
  • FMP 333 - Video Production

    (3)
    Fundamentals of camera, lighting, sound, editing, and storytelling in regards to the production process. Emphasis on single-camera production.  (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  • FMP 336 - Broadcast Sound Production

    (3)
    Fundamentals of sound, radio, announcing, audio management and auditory storytelling for effective communication with sound. Emphasis on both radio and Foley productions.  (Offered spring.)
  
  • FMP 337 - Media Management & Promotion

    (3)
    Principles of media management with an emphasis on business management, marketing, social networking, promotion, sales, and audience analysis. (Offered spring.) Prerequisite(s): MDIA 102 .
  
  • FMP 338 - Web Design & Development

    (3)
    This course provides the foundational skills and design depth that allow students to build modern websites that adhere to coding best practices, Web Standards, and accessibility guidelines. (Offered spring)
  
  • FMP 339 - Motion Graphics

    (3)
    This course explores media technologies with an emphasis on motion graphic design.  This course introduces and develops essential skills in color grading, 2D animation, image design, video compositing, special effects, and the distribution of linear media for television, web, and mobile devices.  (Offered fall.)
  
  • FMP 340 - Digital Storytelling

    (3)
    Students are introduced to storytelling in a specific genre (e.g., 3-act structure, proper conflict, plot, character, dialogue, cinematography, sound, and genre hybrids). Students write, revised, and critique a genre-oriented script. Course may be repeatable under different topics. (Offered fall and spring.) Prerequisite(s): MDIA 102 Media Criticism and Analysis .
  
  • FMP 345 - Screenwriting

    (3)
    Students are introduced to the elements of screenwriting (e.g., 3-act structure, proper screenplay format, conflict, plot, character, point of view, dialogue, step outline, and treatment). Students write, revise, and critique screenwriting in a structured workshop setting.  (Offered as needed.) Prerequisite(s): UC 110  or ENGL 111 .
  
  • FMP 346 - Myth and Cinema

    (3)
    Students examine myth as a living process in film and modern storytelling by examining archetypes and the Monomyth. Films that demonstrate themes and archetypes are watched and discussed. (Offered fall.) Prerequisite(s): UC-110 UC-110H or ENGL-111.
  
  • FMP 393 - Selected Topics

    (1-4)
    Repeatable under different topics.  (Offered as needed.)
  
  • FMP 394 - Creative Immersion

    (3)
    FMP 394 is a unique opportunity to immerse students in an intermediate/advanced creative and technical capacity to plan, design, and develop professional video content with a specific focus.  The primary objective of this course is to immerse students in the development of emerging media communication focused on creative and technical aspects. Repeatable. (Offered spring.)
  
  • FMP 395 - Film and Media Production Internship

    (1-12)
    Qualified students work on-site with professional supervision in a variety of organizational settings.  Departmental internships may be repeated up to a maximum of 12 hours. (Offered each semester.) Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or permission of instructor.
  
  • FMP 433 - Advanced Video Production

    (3)
    Advanced study and performance of production fundamentals with an emphasis on producing, directing and storytelling. Emphasis on single-camera productions.  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of   (C or better required).
  
  • FMP 436 - Foley Art and ADR

    (3)
    Advanced study of film audio production with an emphasis on atmospheric sounds, ADR (Automated Dialogue Replacement, foley art, and sound design and mixing 5.1 surround sound. (Offered spring semester even years.) Prerequisite(s): FMP 336  with a C or better. 
  
  • FMP 491 - Individual Study


    Specialized study in an area of radio, television or film under the supervision of a faculty member with an approved format. Repeatable to a maximum of 12 hours.  (Offered as needed.)
  
  • FMP 493 - Selected Topics

    (1-6)
    Repeatable under different topics.  (Offered as needed.)
  
  • FMP 494 - Immersion

    (3)
    FMP 494 is a unique opportunity to immerse students in a professional capacity to plan, design, and develop video content for a prescribed client.  The primary objective of this course is to immerse students in the development of emerging media communication, where the end result will be a community with a visual presence far better than the one before the onset of the project. Repeatable. (Offered in fall semesters.) Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. 
  
  • FMP 495 - Film and Media Internship

    (0-12)
    Qualified students work on-site with supervisory professionals in a variety of organizations in order to develop career-oriented knowledge and skills. Departmental internship hours repeatable to a maximum of 12 credit hours. (Offered fall/spring/summer.)

English

  
  • ENGL 100 - Basic Writing

    (4)
    English 100 engages students in the full writing process - invention, drafting, revising, and editing - to prepare them for the rigors of Signature Learning Writing Goal and for academic writing in general. Basic Writing focuses on composing essays and is not a grammar review course, though editing concerns are covered. Students who have taken UC 110  or ENGL 111  may not take English 100 for credit or to fulfill an elective requirement in any major or minor. Taken Pass/Fail only. Note: ENGL 100 does not meet the Signature Learning Writing outcome.  (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  • ENGL 102 - Writing for International Students

    (3)
    English 102 is designed specifically for non-native English speakers who have reached the 500 TOEFL level. Assignments will focus on preparing students for the Gen. Ed. requirement in writing. This course covers the same material as  , but is tailored specifically for students who are writing in a second language.  (Offered as needed.)
  
  • ENGL 111 - Academic Composition

    (4)
    A study of written communication conventions aimed at developing students’ abilities to form, express, organize, and support their ideas clearly and effectively in writing. The skills in focus are those of reading, writing, research, and critical thinking.  Students produce at least four projects totaling about twenty-five pages of writing and culminating in an argumentative research paper of ten plus pages. (Offered fall / spring.) Prerequisite(s): Fulfills Signature Learning Writing Requirement.
  
  • ENGL 122 - Media and Society

    (3)
    Critical approaches to multiple media texts, examining their creation, development, and relationships to society and culture. (Same course offered as COMM 131 .)  (Offered as needed.)
  
  • ENGL 150 - Introduction to Literature

    (4)
    This course is a study of a variety of poems, short stories, plays and novels from a range of historical and geographical backgrounds.  Using critical approaches and college-level research skills, students will develop skills for critically analyzing and clearly writing about literary texts. They will also investigate key issues and controversies within the discipline and begin to formulate their own literary theory. (Offered fall / spring.)
  
  • ENGL 193 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 6)
    Offered as needed.
  
  • ENGL 204 - Creative Writing

    (4)
    Fulfills Signature Learning Fine Arts Requirement. A disciplined workshop in fiction, poetry and creative non-fiction.  (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  • ENGL 230 - New Media and Writing

    (4)
    Exploration of roles and uses of new media in composition. Special attention paid to topics such as identity construction and performance, visual rhetoric, digital divide, and intercultural communication in the information age.  (Once to twice a year.)
  
  • ENGL 242 - Literature, Art and Society

    (4)
    Students will analyze a particular literary genre - poetry, fiction, drama, or non-fiction - through the historical survey of two major periods (e.g., Romanticism and Modernism) that integrates philosophy, religion, and the arts.  Prerequisite(s): UC 110  or ENGL 111 
  
  • ENGL 245 - Genre Studies: Drama

    (3)
    Study of a single literary genre. 
  
  • ENGL 250 - Survey of British Literature I

    (4)
    A survey of English Literature extending from the early medieval period to the mid-18th century.  Major representative authors and texts are studied in historical, cultural and intellectual contexts. (Every third semester.)
  
  • ENGL 251 - Survey of British Literature II

    (4)
    A survey of significant texts, authors, modes and movements in literary production from the 18th through mid-20th century. Major representative authors and texts are studied in historical, cultural and intellectual contexts. (Every third semester.)
  
  • ENGL 255 - Survey of American Literature

    (4)
    American literature from pre-Colonial times to the beginning of the modern period. Major representative authors and texts are studied in historical, cultural and intellectual contexts. (Offered every third semester.)
  
  • ENGL 263 - Latin American Literature

    (4)
    This introductory course in non-Western literature explores fiction, poetry, and other literary genres from Central and South America. It focuses on the twentieth century and contemporary literature in its social and political contexts. (Students may not take both this course and SPAN 355  for credit. Only one will count.) 
  
  • ENGL 265 - Middle Eastern Literature

    (4)
    This introductory course in non-Western Literature explores fiction, poetry, and other literary genres from the Middle East.  It focuses primarily on the 20th century and contemporary literature in its social, economic and political contexts. 
  
  • ENGL 270 - Ethnic and Women’s Literature

    (4)
    The course provides an intensive study of the literature of ethnic and women writers in the United States within historical, social and cultural contexts.  We will investigate the roots of prejudice against marginalized groups, including women, and the power dynamics of the struggle for inclusion and equal representation that continues in our time. Key works by significant Native American, African American, Latino/a and women writers, primarily from the 20th and early 21st centuries, will include fiction, poetry and nonfiction. 
  
  • ENGL 275 - Native American Literature and Culture

    (4)
    The course provides a study of literatures and cultures of Native Americans, emphasizing the writing of a range of Native peoples from the last half of the 20th century.  The fiction, poetry, and other genres are presented in their historical and cultural contexts.
  
  • ENGL 280 - Detective Fiction

    (4)
    A chronological introduction to the genre, with an emphasis upon recent revisions and re-imagings of traditional themes, characters, plots, and settings, including the continuing creative intersection of detective fiction with film.  
  
  • ENGL 282 - Contemporary American Fiction

    (4)
    This course covers American fiction from the 1980s to the present. It considers these works as imaginative responses to contemporary culture and aesthetic accomplishments. 
  
  • ENGL 283 - Banned Books

    (4)
    This course introduces students to the study of book censorship from both literary and social-historical standpoint. Students will study the reception history of varied books and challenged books, including banning attempts in the United States as well as examples from different countries.  The course is appropriate as an elective offering for both English majors and non-majors.
  
  • ENGL 284 - Graphic Novel

    (4)
    Study of graphic novel as it has developed from roots in twentieth century comics. The course focuses on works in their social, economic, and political context. It also includes study of the particular textual and visual conventions of this form.
  
  • ENGL 290 - Classical Mythology

    (4)
    A study of myth, primarily Greek, Roman and Norse, as expressions of the human imagination and as influences on other forms of literature. Topics may vary. 
  
  • ENGL 293 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 4)
    Offered as needed.
  
  • ENGL 293 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 6)
    Offered as needed.
  
  • ENGL 294 - Classical Literature and Culture

    (4)
    This course provides students with a survey of Greek and Latin literature in translation from Homer to Ovid.  Historical and cultural contexts of political history, art and architecture, religious and philosophical thought are explored for grounding our readings.  Primary texts include samples of epic and lyric poetry, drama, history and philosophy. Prerequisite(s): UC 110  or ENGL 111 .     
  
  • ENGL 296 - Florence and the Renaissance

    (4)
    An exploration of the transition from the medieval world of Dante to the Renaissance of classical learning and art, fostered by the Medici.  While predominantly a study of literature and philosophy, this course seeks to ground reading texts in a broader historical and cultural context of the visual arts, architecture, religion and politics. Prerequisite(s): UC 110  or ENGL 111 
  
  • ENGL 301 - Poetry Writing

    (4)
    Students read, write and revise contemporary poetry in a workshop setting, learn about the basics of publishing, and attend local readings. Repeatable for credit up to eight hours.   Prerequisite(s): ENGL 204.
  
  • ENGL 302 - Fiction Writing

    (4)
    Students write, revise and critique fiction in a structured workshop setting, learn about the basics of the publishing industry and attend local literary readings. Repeatable for credit up to eight hours.  Prerequisite(s): ENGL 204 
  
  • ENGL 303 - Creative Non-Fiction

    (4)
    Students read, write, and revise creative non-fiction in a workshop setting, study forms of non-fiction and elements of craft, and learn about the basics of publishing creative non-fiction. Repeatable for credit up to eight hours.  (Offered spring.) Prerequisite(s): ENGL 204 .
  
  • ENGL 310 - Writing in the Professions

    (4)
    General coverage of the writing activities and tasks commonly encountered in business and technical communication; focused attention will be given to business and technical report writing, proposal writing, and other writing tasks often completed in the corporate and non-profit sectors. (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  • ENGL 336 - Writing for the Web

    (4)
    Students engage in theory governing composition and design of web texts and put that theory into practice. (Offered one time per year.)
  
  • ENGL 340 - English Language

    (4)
    A study of the development and grammar of English including the history of the language, its structure, and the acquisition of language by native speakers.(Offered spring.)
  
  • ENGL 343 - Shakespeare & Company

    (4)
    This course provides students with an introduction to Shakespeare’s full range of dramatic genres, and his non-dramatic poetry.  Plays by some of Shakespeare’s contemporaries are also read to provide an awareness of the variety in Elizabethan and Jacobean drama. (Offered spring.)
  
  • ENGL 344 - Dante

    (4)
    This course familiarizes students with the poetic works of greatest poet in the Western tradition, Dante.  By reading the Vita Nuova and the Divine Comedy, students will gain a deeper understanding of the philosophy, religion and historical context of Medieval Italy.
  
  • ENGL 345 - Major Authors - (Varies)

    (4)
    This upper level course focuses on key works by one or two major authors.  Through this intensive focus, students will gain a depth of understanding of particular authors and recognize the developments in their writing.  Recent offerings include Jane Austen, Hemingway and Faulkner, Willa Cather and the West, Joyce and Yeats.  (Offered as needed.)
  
  • ENGL 355 - Medieval Literature

    (4)
    An exploration of European and British Literature of the Medieval period.  Emphasis is placed on reading texts as representations of cultural mores, political and religious concerns, and philosophical ideas. 
  
  • ENGL 356 - Renaissance Literature

    (4)
    An exploration of the literature produced by the Renaissance Humanist movement from 1485 until the writing of Paradise Lost.  Primary focus is on texts produced by English writers, but some early examples of Italian/Latin literature are also included.  Texts are studied in their historical, cultural and intellectual contexts for what they contribute to the development of an English literary tradition. Specific texts will vary. 
  
  • ENGL 359 - Romantic & Victoria Literature

    (4)
    An exploration of the way English literature was transformed by the rise of German Romanticism through the ideas and poetry of the English Romantics, and how the movement evolved into the various forms and approaches to poetry and fiction during the 19th century in the British Isles.  (Offered as needed.)
  
  • ENGL 360 - Literary Modernism

    (4)
    Literary Modernism is survey of literature produced in the cultural context of high Modernism from about 1900-1945.  English, American and some European literary texts are studied in cultural and historical context.  Representative authors include Joyce, Woolf, Eliot, Pound, Fitzgerald and Proust. 
  
  • ENGL 366 - 19th Century American Fiction Prose

    (4)
    An intensive study of key works, ranging from Moby Dick to Little Women to Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Students will study them in their cultural and literary contexts. 
  
  • ENGL 367 - Dickinson, Whitman & Company

    (4)
    Focusing on Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman, this course is an intensive study of key works of 19th century American poetry.  Students will study these poets in their literary and historical contexts.  The course includes a survey of their literary influences (American and British Romantic poets) as well as the poets they influenced.
  
  • ENGL 368 - African American Literature

    (4)
    An intensive study of African-American writers, male and female, of the 1920s to 1960s. This course analyzes key writers leading up to and included in the Harlem Renaissance and then traces the development of the Black Arts Movement. (Offered as needed.)
  
  • ENGL 370 - Modern and Contemporary Drama

    (4)
    This advanced literature course explores a range of plays throughout the 20th century and into the 21st. We begin with some modern classics; however, many of the plays studied are contemporary. The class also has a global reach. Plays will be discussed from a range of critical and dramatic perspectives. 
  
  • ENGL 371 - U.S. Literature Since WWII

    (4)


    This advanced literature course focuses on the fiction, drama and poetry that responds to the shifts in the U.S. society, culture and place in the world after World War Two.  From Allen Ginsberg’s Howl and James Baldwin’s Go Tell It on the Mountain to the works of Toni Morrison and Sam Shepard, this course explores the ways U.S. writers engages their cultural, social, and political contexts.

     

  
  • ENGL 393 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 6)
    Offered as needed.
  
  • ENGL 480 - Senior Seminar for English Majors

    (4)
    This capstone course focuses on the theoretical questions, disciplinary controversies and critical approaches central to the study of literature. Students will do extensive scholarly reading and writing.  (Offered fall.) Prerequisite(s): Senior Standing.
  
  • ENGL 491 - Individual Study

    (1-8)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  • ENGL 493 - Selected Topics

    (1-4)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  • ENGL 493 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 6)
    Offered as needed.
  
  • ENGL 495 - Internship in Professional Writing

    (1-4)
    Qualified students may apply to work with a variety of professional editors, writers and communicators in the Columbus area. Past internships have included Ohio Magazine, state government, Wexner Center, Ohio Bar Association, Columbus Dispatch, and Columbus Blue Jackets.  (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  • JRNL 223 - News Writing and Reporting

    (4)
    Introduction to basic journalism techniques of investigation, interviewing, reporting, writing and photography.  (Offered fall.)
  
  • JRNL 320 - Editing & Design

    (4)
    An introduction to the theory and practice of copy editing and design.  The student who successfully completes this course will demonstrate competency in editing the written word, writing headlines and captions and practicing sound news judgment.  The student will also be able to apply industry-standard software in designing pages and displaying photographs and other art.  Use of a content management system will be the method of web production. (Offered in fall and spring.) Prerequisite(s): UC 110  or ENGL 111  or the equivalent.
  
  • JRNL 323 - Publications Practicum

    (1- 4)
    Supervised practicum in reporting, writing or photography for the campus newspaper.  (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  • JRNL 326 - Ethics, Law, and Media

    (4)
    What is privacy when cameras and social media can report nearly everything we do? Why can the media portray famous people in a bad light? Laws of libel, privacy and obscenity will be explored in addition to First Amendment theories and case studies in ethics. (Offered spring.)

Environmental Science

  
  • ENVS 193 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 4)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College.Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  • ENVS 230 - Environmental Geology

    (3)
    Natural Science Group A:  An introduction to physical and chemical geologic processes and natural resources as they relate to human activity and societal issues. Topics include geologic hazards (earthquakes, floods, volcanoes and landslides), water quality and supply issues, waste disposal issues and environmental consideration in extracting energy and mineral resources. Analysis of field and laboratory data using statistical, graphical and critical thinking analysis. Offered fall and spring.
  
  • ENVS 250 - Environmental Science

    (4)
    Fulfills Natural Science General Education Group B requirement. An introduction to the discipline of environmental science, an interdisciplinary field concerned with investigating the nature and interactions of the hydrosphere, geosphere, atmosphere and biosphere. Major topics include biogeochemical cycles, physical and chemical oceanography, ecology, population dynamics, natural resources, meteorology and climate change, and contemporary societal issues such as waste management and air and water pollution. Collection and analysis of field and laboratory data using statistical, graphical and critical thinking skills. Offered fall semester. 
  
  • ENVS 293 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 4)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College.Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  • ENVS 315 - Research Methods in Environmental and Biological Sciences

    (3)
    An introduction to the techniques and practices of biological and environmental science research focusing on experiential design, critical literature review, data analysis, and scientific writing. (Same course offered as BIOL 315 .) Offered fall and spring semester. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 152 .
  
  • ENVS 393 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 4)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College.Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  • ENVS 400 - Environmental Science Seminar

    (1)
    Seminar in advanced research methodology examining current complex phenomena and programs through individualized research projects. Includes written and oral presentations of completed research. Prerequisite(s): Must be a Senior Environmental Science Major or minor to enroll in this course.  
  
  • ENVS 410 - Field Studies

    (0-3)
    Off-campus field study opportunities led by department faculty, often occurring during the summer, winter or spring breaks. Topical studies will vary according to time and locations of the course. Prerequisites will vary according to the topic; credit will vary according to the length and complexity of the course.
  
  • ENVS 491 - Individual Study

    (1-6)
    Environmental research or in-depth study of a topic not normally available through other courses.
  
  • ENVS 493 - Selected Topics

    (1-6)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College.Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  • ENVS 495 - Internship

    (1-6)
    An opportunity for advanced students to look at careers in environmental science. Requires a written proposal, an off-campus adviser and permission of the department chair.
 

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