May 24, 2024  
2021 - 2022 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2021 - 2022 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

Course Descriptions


 

Physics

  
  • PHYS 220 - General Physics I

    (4)
    A calculus-based introduction to the fundamental principles of physics. Topics include: mechanics (linear and rotational kinematics, statics, energy), wave mechanics (harmonic motion, sound) and thermodynamics (thermal properties of matter, gas laws, thermal energy). A laboratory experience is included which utilizes statistical, algebraic and trigonometric (pre-calculus) skills to conduct measurements, analyze data and develop physical understanding. Offered fall semester. Prerequisite(s): MATH 230 , MATH 231 , MATH 225 , or MATH 330 . Corequisite(s): PHYS-220L
  
  • PHYS 221 - General Physics II

    (4)
    A continuation of PHYS 220 . Topics include: electromagnetism (electricity, magnetism, circuits), optics (light propagation, geomechanics, and physical optics), and modern physics (relativity, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear theory). A laboratory experience is included which utilizes statistical, algebraic and trigonometric (pre-calculus) skills to conduct measurements, analyze data and develop physical understanding. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 220 ; Corequisite(s): PHYS 221L. Offered spring semester.
  
  • PHYS 293 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 4)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College.  Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  • PHYS 393 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 4)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College.  Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  • PHYS 396 - Computational Physics

    (3)
    This course is designed to introduce some of the computational methods used in physics. Students will work in groups and are expected to use prior knowledge from calculus, general physics, and computational science to develop appropriate strategies for solving problems. Use of a combination of different methodologies (algebraic, numerical, graphical/visual) is expected. (Same course offered as CSAC 396 .) Prerequisite(s):  .
  
  • PHYS 433 - Modern Physics

    (3)
    A survey of the theories of relativity, quantum mechanics (wave particle duality, harmonic oscillator, spin), atomic (Bohr model, spectroscopy), nuclear (models, transmutation), and solid state (semiconductors) physics. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 221 . Offered fall semester in even years.
  
  • PHYS 448 - Intermediate Lab

    (3)
    Selected experiments including several from modern physics. Corequisite(s): PHYS 433 
  
  • PHYS 491 - Individual Study

    (1-3)
    Intended for those who wish to study an area of physics not included in a regular course. Prior approval by the supervising professor must be secured before registration.
  
  • PHYS 493 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 4)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College.  Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.

Political Science

  
  • POLS 105 - American Govern and Politics

    (3)
    The course provides a study of the dynamics and organization of the federal government; its institutions, processes, powers, functions and problems. It prepares students to become knowledgeable, thoughtful, participating citizens in a democratic society and in an interdependent world. Students examine and engage in civic activities, utilizing their knowledge of political institutions and processes to become active, participating citizens. Students develop an understanding of the principles of democracy and the extent to which governments reflect these principles. They use various community, state, national and international resources to help them think critically about political science. Attention is given to the methodology of social studies, applying problem solving, critical thinking and application skills to make comparisons among various forms of governments.  (Offered fall, spring.)
  
  • POLS 120 - Introduction to Political Theory

    (3)
    This course introduces students to the foundations of political thought. Students will learn to think carefully about some of the most basic questions of political life, to construct meaningful questions about politics, and to learn to speak and write about politics clearly and courageously. Through a close consideration of primary texts - including traditional works of political theory, short stores and film - students will critically engage concepts and controversies dealing with justice, authority, legitimacy, violence, power, and others.  (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  • POLS 193 - Selected Topics

    (3)
  
  • POLS 202 - Philosophy and Politics I: Ancient and Medieval

    (3)
    Classical and medieval political philosophies are studied, as are the tension between faith and reason, justice, obligation and disobedience, virtue, the good, and the best regime. Students develop and apply problem solving, critical thinking and application skills regarding the content under study. Course may be taken for philosophy or political science credit. (Offered as needed.)
  
  • POLS 205 - Intro to Public Policy

    (3)
    This course is designed to provide the student with basic knowledge of public policy. Students will survey the approaches and methods of policy studies, contemporary policy issues, and future considerations of public policies.  (Offered spring-even years.) Prerequisite(s): POLS 104  or  .
  
  • POLS 209 - Philosophy and Politics II: Modern and Contemporary

    (3)
    Modern and contemporary political philosophies are studied, as are modern political ideologies and issues of political thought, including freedom, justice, democracy, revolution, rights, law, punishment, civil disobedience, preferential treatment, war and peace, property, utopias and dystopias. Students develop and apply problem solving, critical thinking and application skills regarding the content under study. Course may be taken for philosophy or political science credit. Offered as needed.
  
  • POLS 210 - International Relations

    (3)
    This course will prepare students to become knowledgeable, thoughtful, participating citizens in a democratic society and in an interdependent world. Students are provided with an understanding of the links people make around the world as they have attempted to address common problems in the past and continue to address them presently. National foreign policies are studied as is the significance of each. Common interests and differences that exist between nations are explored.  (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  • POLS 225 - The American Presidency

    (3)
    This course analyzes the president’s power, role and personality; interrelationships with other branches; decision-making procedures; impact on political parties, press and people.  (Offered spring-odd years.) Prerequisite(s): POLS 105 .
  
  • POLS 230 - Comparative Politics

    (3)
    This course will introduce students to the basic concepts and theories used in comparing politics in nations throughout the contemporary world. This course’s primary goal is to introduce and train students in comparative method. Topics covered include political culture, structures, political participation, conflict, parties, public policy and regime types.  (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  • POLS 293 - Selected Topics

    (0-3)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College. Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  • POLS 313 - Human Rights in a Global Perspective

    (3)
    Examination of the human rights discourse that emerged as a reaction to the atrocities committed during World War II, and that now forms one of the central normative frameworks of international law and international relations. Introduction to specific policy areas-such as torture, forced migration, slavery, sexual trafficking, the rights of indigenous peoples, and the rights of children-that make human rights a contentious subject for diplomats and scholars alike. (Offered fall-odd years.)
  
  • POLS 331 - Political Development

    (3)
    Is global income inequality simply an unfortunate side effect of economic competition between countries with different resource endowments, or is it caused by patterns of political domination that were established during the colonial era?  Are the world’s poorest countries poor because their governments are ineffective (or hopelessly corrupt), or are they poor because they have pursued unwise economic policies?  What role do geography, culture, and regime type play in explaining global income inequality? (Offered spring-odd years.)
  
  • POLS 334 - Democracy and Democratization

    (3)


    How do we define and measure the concept of democracy? Why have democratic governments been established in some countries but not others? What is the relationship between socioeconomic development and democracy? Do certain cultural attributes increase the likelihood that a country might achieve a successful transition from authoritarian rule to democracy? What roles do domestic elites, middle class groups, workers, and international actors play in either promoting or undermining democratization efforts? (Offered fall-even years.)

     

  
  • POLS 335 - American Foreign Policy and Diplomacy

    (3)
    This course analyzes the history, development and current patterns of American foreign policy and diplomacy with emphasis on America’s emergence as a world power, linkages between domestic and foreign policy, the decision-making process and the challenges of global interdependence. (Same course offered as HIST 335 .)  (Offered fall-odd years.)
  
  • POLS 340 - Latin American Politics and History

    (3)
    This course analyzes the history, culture, geography, economic relations and political systems of Latin America; the role of the Catholic Church, the military, multinational corporations, guerrilla groups and the United States within the context of Latin American politics. It will cover issues such as revolution, economic development, population growth, drug trade and the debt crisis. (Same course offered as HIST 340 .)  (Offered as needed.)
  
  • POLS 350 - Modern Political Ideologies

    (3)
    This course will examine the origins of political ideologies in modern societies. After identifying the place of liberalism and conservatism in political thought, students will study the critiques of these ideological traditions made by radical libertarians, socialists, fascists, environmentalists and feminists.  (Offered fall-even years.)
  
  • POLS 365 - Gender Politics

    (3)
    This course is a study of how ideas about gender shape political relations and of how political relations shape ideas about gender. (Same course offered as CLS 365 .)  (Offered spring-even years.) Prerequisite(s): POLS 105 ; or permission of instructor.
  
  • POLS 370 - Parties and Elections

    (3)
    This course explains how Americans select presidents, examines the evolution of these processes, and investigates debates on the problems of the current presidential selection process.  (Offered fall-even years.) Prerequisite(s): POLS 104  or   or permission of instructor.
  
  • POLS 375 - Peace and War

    (3)
    This course examines ethical approaches to war and peace in the modern world, the experience of warfare, evolution of war as a human institution, and the role of technology in changing the effects of war. Students will examine their religious and moral convictions in developing their own ethical response to issues of war and peace. The course will explore the all-important topic of peace: What is it; How do we build it; and How we maintain it?  (Offered as needed.) Prerequisite(s): No pre-requisite.
  
  • POLS 380 - Public Opinion and Pol Behavior

    (3)
    This course analyzes mass political attitudes and their expression in various forms of political activity as well as the interrelationship between mass political attitudes, political behavior, and public policy outcomes. Emphasis is placed on learning the terminology and techniques necessary to do and interpret survey-based research.  (Offered fall-even years.) Prerequisite(s): POLS 105 ; and one other political science course, or permission of the instructor.
  
  • POLS 390 - Early American Law: Constitutional History of the U.S. to 1865

    (3)
    This course provides a survey of legal and constitutional history from 1763 to 1865 with emphasis on how political, economic, social and ideological change affected the structure and function of American law. (Same course offered as HIST 390 .)  (Offered as needed.) Prerequisite(s): POLS 105 .
  
  • POLS 391 - Modern American Law: Constitutional History of the U.S. since 1865

    (3)
    This course provides a survey of modern legal and constitutional history with emphasis on how political, economic, social and ideological change affected the structure and function of American law. (Same course offered as HIST 391 .)  (Offered as needed.) Prerequisite(s): POLS 105 .
  
  • POLS 393 - Selected Topics

    (3)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College. Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  • POLS 491 - Individual Study

    (1-3)
    Select topics under supervision of faculty member with individual research format.  (Offered as needed.)
  
  • POLS 493 - Selected Topics

    (3)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College. Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  • POLS 495 - Political Science Internship

    (3-6)
    Practicum through placement in state, local or federal government agency, expressly political organization, or political campaign. Academic coursework will be supervised by a member of the faculty. No more than six hours can be taken in total.(Offered as needed.) Prerequisite(s): POLS105, POS120, POS210 and POLS230
  
  • POLS 498 - Senior Thesis

    (3-6)
    Students research a political question of their choice, and compose a substantial paper of no less than 9,000 words. The paper will demonstrate mastery of political concepts, approaches in research, and proficiency in writing.  Theses should be an original synthesis of material, primarily in the student’s own words, and cannot have been submitted for credit in another course.  No more than six hours can be taken in total. (Offered as needed) Prerequisite(s): POLS-105, POLS-120, POLS-210, AND POLS-230.

Psychology

  
  • CHEM 293 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 4)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College. Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  • PSYCH 120 - Introduction to Psychology

    (4)
    Fulfills Social Sciences Goal. An introduction to psychology: biopsychology, sensation/perception, learning, memory, language, thought, motivation, personality, emotion, stress, development, social psychology and psychological disorders and therapies. Students will be exposed to and engage in psychological research and activities in order to emphasize the scientific nature of psychology. This course emphasizes a deeper and more comprehensive exposure to particular contemporary psychological topics and issues. This course is for psychology majors and minors and for non-majors. Students can only receive credit once when taking PSYCH-120 and PSYCH-121. Offered fall/spring. Prerequisite(s): None
  
  • PSYCH 121 - General Psychology

    (3)
    Fulfills Social Sciences Goal.  An introduction to psychology: biopsychology, sensation/perception, learning, memory, language, thought, motivation, personality, emotion, stress, development, and social psychology and psychological disorders and therapies. This course is specifically designed for non-majors. Students can only receive credit once when taking PSYCH-120 and PSYCH-121. Offered fall/spring. Prerequisite(s): None.
  
  • PSYCH 171 - Bystander Intervention

    (1)
    Students read and discuss the literature related to bystander intervention and being a prosocial bystander both in general and with a focus on sexual assault prevention.  Students develop peer-educator skills related to bystander intervention so that they can teach others about being a prosocial bystander.
  
  • PSYCH 200 - Psychology Ethics

    (1)
    An introduction to ethical reasoning in psychology including an interpretation of the ethics code as applied to evaluation, assessment, intervention, advertising, public statements, therapy, privacy, confidentiality, teaching, research and publishing. Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s): This course fulfills the requirements for CRIM-200. This course is graded pass/fail.
  
  • PSYCH 201 - Educational Psychology

    (4)
    The foundation for critical thinking about the observation of teaching and learning, including teaching in relation to individual, developmental and cultural differences; research and applications from behavioral and cognitive perspectives; and educational measurement strategies.Offered fall/spring. Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 120 - Introduction to Psychology  or PSYCH 121 - General Psychology  
  
  • PSYCH 293 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 4)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College. Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  • PSYCH 300 - Psychology Career Planning

    (1)
    Preparation for graduate training and psychology careers. Students will learn about application to graduate school and the G.R.E., and develop a graduate study and/or career plan. Offered fall/spring Prerequisite(s): Junior standing. This course fulfills the requirements for CRIM 301 . This course is graded pass/fail.
  
  • PSYCH 310 - Developmental Psychology

    (4)
    Human physical, psychological and social development from conception through the intrauterine environment, birth, early and middle childhood, adolescence, and young, middle, and older adulthood. Offered fall/spring. Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 120 - Introduction to Psychology  or PSYCH 121 - General Psychology  
  
  • PSYCH 320 - Social/Personality Psychology

    (4)
    The study of a person’s behaviors, mental processes and personality variables relevant to group interactions. Topics include helping and aggression, social cognition, attitudes, persuasion, prejudice, group dynamics and influence. Offered fall/spring. Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 120 - Introduction to Psychology  or PSYCH 121 - General Psychology .
  
  
  • PSYCH 340 - Clinical/Abnormal Psychology

    (4)
    Historical understanding and symptomatology of organic, childhood, anxiety, dissociative, affective and personality disorders, schizophrenia and deviant behavior, including consideration of legal and ethical issues. Offered fall/spring. Prerequisite(s):    or PSYCH 121 - General Psychology 
  
  
  
  
  
  • PSYCH 382 - Death, Dying and Bereavement

    (4)
    Through psychological and interdisciplinary approaches learners will gain an understanding and appreciation of the processes of dying, death, and bereavement. Theoretical, historical, and emerging perspectives will be explored. Offered fall. Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 120 - Introduction to Psychology  or PSYCH 121 - General Psychology .
  
  • PSYCH 383 - Psychological Assessment

    (4)
    Students learn the foundations of psychometric testing as well as techniques for assessing intelligence, achievement, aptitude, interest, personality, behavior, and neuropsychological functioning. Students practice communicating assessment results orally and in writing. 
  
  • PSYCH 384 - Forensic Psychology

    (4)
    Students learn about the major areas, topics and theories of forensic psychology. Topics include psychopathy, behavioral profiling, eyewitness identification and testimony, evaluation of criminal suspects, forensic assessment of competency to stand trial, and forensic assessment of sanity. 
  
  • PSYCH 385 - Neuroscience & Meditation

    (4)
    Through practice and inquiry this course offers exploration of contemporary research on neuroscience and the brain as it applies to meditation and contemplative practice. Offered in spring. Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 120  or PSYCH 121 ; or permission of instructor.
  
  • PSYCH 393 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 4)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College. Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  • PSYCH 394 - Computational Neuroscience and Psychology

    (3)
    This course provides a modeling approach in the fields of psychology and neuroscience. Topics may include decision making, learning models, neuro imaging techniques, and neural networks. 
  
  • PSYCH 410 - History and Systems of Psychology

    (4)
    The history and development of psychological thought from the early Greeks through present times, with an emphasis on philosophical and physiological antecedents of contemporary psychology, primary sources readings and structured essay writing. Offered fall/spring. Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 120 - Introduction to Psychology  or PSYCH 121 - General Psychology , and senior standing or by permission of instructor.
  
  
  • PSYCH 491 - Individual Study

    (1-4)
    Individual, independent study with a faculty mentor. Offered as needed.
  
  • PSYCH 493 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 4)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College. Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  • PSYCH 493 - Selected Topics

    (1-4)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  • PSYCH 495 - Psychological Internship

    (1-4)
    Supervised field experience in a psychological setting accompanied by relevant library research and reflective writing. This course is primarily experiential learning. Repeatable up to 8 hours. Offered fall/spring/summer.
  
  • PSYCH 499 - Undergraduate Psych Thesis

    (4)
    Independent student scholarship usually comprising a comprehensive literature review, design and completion of psychological research, and a written and oral presentation of findings. Offered as needed.

Public Relations

  
  • PR 100 - Pre-Professional Studies

    (0-6)
    Laboratory experience in public relations. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 hours. (Offered fall / spring.)
  
  • PR 161 - Introduction to Public Relations

    (3)
    A survey of the field of public relations, including the scope of the field, structure, processes, theoretical perspectives, job titles and tasks.  (Offered fall/spring/summer.)
  
  • PR 193 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 4)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College.  Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  • PR 262 - PR Writing

    (3)
    An introduction to writing and production for public relations purposes, including news releases, features, direct response and brochures, and the fundamentals of desktop publishing.  (Offered fall/spring.) Prerequisite(s):  PR 161 .
  
  • PR 267 - Non-Profit Organizations

    (3)
    This multidisciplinary course provides a foundational understanding of the non-profit sector. It helps students appreciate the importance of building and maintaining relationships between non-profit organizations and their stakeholders. In particular, the course explores the important aspects of philanthropy in the United States, how non-profit organizations work and are funded, as well as the fundraising process used by numerous non-profit
    organizations throughout the United States. (Offered Spring)
     
  
  • PR 293 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 4)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College.  Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  • PR 300 - Advanced Pre-Professional Studies

    (0-6)
    Advanced laboratory experience in public relations. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite(s): PR 100 .
  
  • PR 363 - PR Research

    (3)
    A review of syndicated research used by PR practitioners, the concept and methodologies of evaluative research, and development of the media mix. Students will learn the principles of research and strategic planning, and apply them to research and media planning opportunities.  (Offered spring.) Prerequisite(s): PR 262  and sophomore standing.
  
  • PR 365 (CE) - Event Planning (Community Engagement)

    (3)
    In this course, students will gain a familiarity with the structure, strategies, planning, and economics of the field of Event Planning. Students will also gain a greater understanding of how their professional roles impact the relationship between the organization and its critical stakeholders. Moreover, students will gain an understanding of the role of Event Planning in building organization-stakeholder relationships.  (Offered spring semester.) Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
  
  • PR 369 - Crisis Management

    (3)
    This course focuses on crisis communication and management, emphasizing the ethical and practical application of theories, strategies, and tactics from a public relations perspective. The stages of pre-crisis, crisis, and post-crisis are examined, and a variety of case studies are discussed. (Offered every third semester.) Prerequisite(s): PR 161 Introduction to Public Relations .
  
  • PR 393 - Selected Topics

    (3)
    Repeatable under different topics.  (Offered as needed.)
  
  • PR 393 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 4)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College.  Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  • PR 395 - Public Relations - Internship

    (1-12)
    Qualified students work on-site with professional supervision in a variety of organizational settings.  Departmental internships may be repeated up to a maximum of 12 hours. (Offered each semester.)
  
  • PR 464 - PR Programs and Campaigns

    (3)
    This course provides students with the opportunity to develop comprehensive public relations programs and campaigns. Student groups develop a PR program for presentation to classmates and PR practitioners. (Offered spring.)  Prerequisite(s): PR 262 .
  
  • PR 491 - Individual Study

    (1-12)
    Specialized study in public relations under the supervision of a faculty member with an approved format.  (Offered fall/spring.)
  
  • PR 493 - Selected Topics

    (1-6)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College.  Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level. (Offered as needed.)
  
  • PR 494 - Client-Based Immersion

    (3)
    This course offers the opportunity to immerse students in a professional capacity to research, plan, implement, and evaluate a variety of client-based communication projects. The course is structured on an agency model, with students functioning in a variety of roles. (Repeatable) (Offered spring.) Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and PR 363 .
  
  • PR 495 - Internship

    (0-12)
    Qualified students work on-site with supervisory professionals in a variety of organizations in order to develop career-oriented knowledge and skills. Departmental internship hours repeatable to a maximum of 12 credit hours. (Offered fall/spring/summer.)

Religion

  
  • RELIG 121 - Elementary Biblical Greek I

    (3)
    Introduction: to prepare the student for the reading of New Testament Greek. (Offered as needed.)
  
  • RELIG 122 - Elementary Biblical Greek II

    (3)
    Continuation of elementary Greek I. (Offered as needed.) Prerequisite(s): RELIG 121 .
  
  • RELIG 152 - Introduction to Asian Religions

    (3)
    This course is a survey of the historical development and contemporary beliefs of the major Asian religious traditions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Chinese and Japanese traditions.  (Offered each fall semester, but not offered in Fall 2021.)
  
  • RELIG 160 - Mythology Around the World

    (3)
    This is a comparative and thematic introduction to mythology that draws from a great variety of the world’s cultures including Africa, China, Egypt, Europe, India, Japan and the Americas.  (Offered as needed.)
  
  • RELIG 170 - Life Stories: Personal, Spiritual and Intellectual Journeys

    (3)
    The course goal is to develop a deeper understanding of the religious life and journey, as well as to encourage students to articulate their own journey. This goal will be achieved through a multidisciplinary examination of religious autobiography and biography in a variety of religious traditions and genres. This course will explore the unique and intensely personal nature of individual spiritual experiences as well as the complexity of their relationship to the tradition of which they are a part.  (Offered as needed.)
  
  • RELIG 180 - Ministry in Congregations

    (3)
    An introduction to the study of congregations and the dynamics of congregational life, exploring the foundations of congregational studies as a discipline, ethnographic studies of congregations, systems theory as applied to congregations, the role of leaders in congregational life, self-reflection as a tool for congregational leaders, and the challenges facing leaders in congregations - particular conflict and racism.  (Offered fall-odd years.)
  
  • RELIG 193 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 4)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College. Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  • RELIG 210 - Jesus Through the Ages

    (3)
    This course surveys the history of interpretation surrounding the person of Jesus both within Christian traditions of theology, art and literature, and beyond those traditions within modern, pluralistic and secular culture.  (Offered as needed.)
  
  • RELIG 215 - Problem of Evil

    (3)
    This course introduces the student to theological reflection upon the experience of evil and suffering in one or more of the following manifestations: natural evil such as death, disease and natural disasters; moral evil such as racism, sexism, environmental destruction and militarism.  (Offered spring-odd years.)
  
  • RELIG 250 - Native American Religions

    (3)
    This course will explore the complexity and variety of Native American religious traditions with an emphasis on the historical impact of colonization upon those traditions.  (Offered spring-odd years.)
  
  • RELIG 280 - Christian Worship

    (3)
    This course provides an introduction to the fundamental rites of Christian worship, with historical, theological, pastoral, and anthropological considerations of their contemporary meaning and renewal. It includes lecture, discussion, demonstration, and practical experience in dealing with the interplay of spatial, musical, and ritual data that enhances the central themes of Word and Sacrament. We will explore the varieties of Christian worship, within Roman Catholic, Orthodox, and Protestant traditions. This class is intended to help the student grow in ability to be a knowledgeable and effective worship leader.  (Offered as needed.)
  
  • RELIG 293 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 4)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College. Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  • RELIG 310 - Religion and Film

    (3)
    A study of the art of the film as a mode of dialogue between religious traditions and contemporary life.  (Offered spring even years.)
  
  • RELIG 320 - History of Christianity

    (3)
    History of Christian thought and institutions from apostolic times to the early Church and middle ages. (Offered as needed.)
  
  • RELIG 321 - Reformation and Enlightenment

    (3)
    Fulfills the Signature Learning Humanities requirement. History of Christian thought and institutions: Reformation and the Enlightenment.  (Offered spring even years.)
  
  • RELIG 322 - Sufffering and Evil in Modern Christian Thought

    (3)
    History of Christian thought and institutions from apostolic time to the present through a study such as the following: the Church Fathers and Medieval Christendom; Reformation and the Enlightenment: the 19th and 20th centuries.
  
  • RELIG 323 - Martin Luther and The Lutheran Tradition

    (3)
    An introduction to the life, thought, and writings of Martin Luther, as well as the history and teachings of the Lutheran tradition from the 16th century until the present. (Offered as needed.)
 

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