Sep 27, 2022  
2021 - 2022 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2021 - 2022 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

Course Descriptions


 

History

  
  •  

    HIST 495 - Internship

    (1-15)
    Qualified students may apply to intern with the Ohio Historical Society, The Washington Center, museums, archives or historic preservation organizations.  (Offered as needed.)

Honors

  
  •  

    HONS 305 - Honors Capstone Proposal

    (2)
    This course prepares students for the Honors Capstone Experience. During this course students develop a proposal that outlines an advanced piece of scholarship that goes above and beyond the expectations currently outlined within the student’s departmental major.  Students also will choose a faculty advisor to assist in the development of the scholarly project. Scholarly projects may include traditional theses or original creative projects (recitals, industry analyses, books, etc.).  (Offered fall, spring.) Prerequisite(s): Selection of advisor and permission of the Director of Honors and Undergraduate Scholarship.
  
  •  

    HONS 405 - Honors Capstone Experience

    (2)
    This course follows the Honors Capstone Proposal. During this course, students carry out the proposed scholarly activity developed in Honors 305. Students are required to present this scholarship to a wider audience at Capital’s Symposium on Undergraduate Scholarship or an alternative conference approved by the faculty advisor and the Director of Honors and Undergraduate Scholarship. (Offered fall, spring) Prerequisite(s):   and permission of the Director of Honors and Undergraduate Scholarship.

Interdisciplinary Studies

  
  •  

    IDS 310 - Interdisciplinary Studies Seminar

    (4)
    Required for all Interdisciplinary Majors. Students will plan an academic course of action to match their professional and personal goals. Through class dialogue, out of class reading and writing assignments, use of on-line research materials, and experiential learning activities students will explore the nature of an interdisciplinary, self-designed major. They will: 1) learn to integrate prior learning as part of their interdisciplinary major; 2) explore the scholarly thesis process, 3) develop their degree plan of action and 4) examine ways of receiving experiential credit. Students will also gain a deepened appreciation for critical reflection and thinking, a sense of fair-mindedness that is grounded in academic integrity, and a value for intellectual humility.   Prerequisite(s): Transfer credit with permission of instructor. 
  
  •  

    IDS 380 - Exploring Human Experiences:(Hope Forgiveness Compassion Courage Happiness Beauty Meaning and Truth)

    (3)
    Through interdisciplinary perspectives this course will explore one of the following focused areas during the length of a semester: hope, forgiveness, compassion, courage, happiness, generosity, meaning, and truth. Endemic to human experience these topics will engage students in various learning modalities. Class discussions, scholarly readings, and research assignments are designed to deepen self-reflection and awareness. Musical playlists, artistic expressions, empirical research projects, critical reading and writing, and a required abstract for submission to the Undergraduate Scholarship Symposium are hallmarks of this course. Two lead faculty guide the course with assistance from other faculty members in such disciplines as art therapy, business, music, nursing, religion and philosophy, psychology, and social work. Offered spring and fall semesters. Prerequisite(s):   or ENGL 111 Academic Composition , sophomore standing, or permission of the lead instructors. 
  
  •  

    IDS 399 - Interdisciplinary Studies Research Methods

    (4)


     

    This course provides the foundation for research design, methodology, data collection, and presentation of results required of scholarly inquiry required of the senior thesis. Students will develop the ability to systematically collect, analyze, and interpret data in order to understand the specific phenomenon they are studying. They will continue to enhance their understanding of the quantitative and qualitative methods used in today’s research. Statistical analysis and data review techniques will be explored. From these students will select the best method to us as they develop the research design and proposal for their final thesis. Prerequisite(s):

     .

  
  •  

    IDS 491 - Independent Study

    (1-8)
  
  •  

    IDS 493 - Selected Topics

    (1-4)
    Periodic course topics of timely interest to students. Credit and prerequisites will vary according to the topic.
  
  •  

    IDS 495 - Internship

    (1-4)
    Optional for Interdisciplinary Studies Majors. The internship allows students to apply their learning in a real world organizational setting. Students will reflect on an analyze the relationship between their academic learning and its application to the accomplishment of career goals. Prerequisite(s): IDS 310 .
  
  •  

    IDS 498 - Interdisciplinary Senior Capstone Project

    (4)
    Interdisciplinary Studies Major are required to take either this class or IDS 499 . Students design and complete a capstone project that responds to an actual need of a professional organization and applies the integrated learning in the student’s major. Prerequisite(s): IDS 399  or SOSCI 220  .
  
  •  

    IDS 499 - Senior Research Project

    (4)
    Students design and complete a capstone research project. Prerequisite(s):  .

International Studies

  
  •  

    IS 100 - International Studies Professional Development Seminar 1

    (1)
    This course introduces students to the International Studies major, faculty and upper-class students. Students will identify career opportunities, learn basic concepts and conceptual approaches to International Studies.  (Offered fall.)
  
  •  

    IS 101 - International Studies Professional Development Seminar 2

    (1)
    A continuation of IS 100 , this class helps students understand different career tracks in the field, identify study abroad opportunities, and begin to understand the variety of subfields of International Studies.  (Offered spring.) Prerequisite(s): IS 100 .
  
  •  

    IS 193 - Selected Topics

    (1-3)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  •  

    IS 293 - Selected Topics

    (1-3)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  •  

    IS 393 - Selected Topics

    (1-3)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  •  

    IS 425 - Capstone Seminar in International Studies

    (3)
    The Capstone Seminar provides majors and minors an opportunity for synthesis and integration in the student’s chosen concentration area. The learning objectives include: review of approaches, current debates, and major research methods (comparison, policy analysis, participation observation, case study, service learning) in the field, the preparation of a major written document, and the preparation and delivery of a formal oral presentation on research or a reflection paper. Prerequisites: Senior standing in the major/minor or permission of the instructor.  (Offered spring.)
  
  •  

    IS 491 - Individual Study

    (1-6)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  •  

    IS 493 - Selected Topics

    (4)
    Select topics under supervision of faculty member in group format with discussion and analysis sessions and individual research projects. (Offered as needed.)
  
  •  

    IS 497 - Internship

    (3-12)
    Placement with a local, state, federal or private agency involved in International affairs, or part of a semester overseas.  (Offered as needed.)

Latin

  
  •  

    LATIN 110 - Elementary Latin I

    (4)
    Introduction to the grammar and syntax of the Latin language and acquisition of basic vocabulary to enable reading of classical Latin texts. Offered fall semester on a three-year rotation.
  
  •  

    LATIN 111 - Elementary Latin II

    (4)
    Continuation of Elementary Latin I with work on grammar, syntax and vocabulary acquisition. Offered spring semester on a three-year rotation. Prerequisite(s): LATIN 110  or placement exam.
  
  •  

    LATIN 191 - Individual Study

    (1-4)
    Intended for majors and minors who wish to study material not covered by a regularly offered course. May not be repeated more than once without permission of department. Prerequisite(s): Permission of department chair.
  
  •  

    LATIN 193 - Selected Topics

    (1-4)


    Intended for majors and minors who wish to study material not covered by a regularly offered course. May not be repeated more than once without permission of department. (Offered as needed.)

     

     

  
  •  

    LATIN 291 - Individual Study

    (1-4)
    Intended for majors and minors who wish to study material not covered by a regularly offered course. May not be repeated more than once without permission of department. Prerequisite(s): Permission of department chair.
  
  •  

    LATIN 293 - Selected Topics

    (1-4)

Mathematics

  
  •  

    CS 293 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 4)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College.  Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level. 
  
  •  

    MATH 110 - Intermediate Algebra

    (3)
    Real numbers; linear equations and inequalities; exponents; polynomial, rational and radical expressions; quadratic equations; linear functions; linear systems of equations. Not open to any student with credit for higher numbered mathematics courses except by permission of the chair. Offered fall semester.
  
  •  

    MATH 120 - College Algebra

    (3)
    Exploration of functions and their graphs, and applications of functions in formulating and solving real-world problems. Examination of polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Open to students who enter with not less than two units of high school algebra. Not open to any student with credit for higher numbered mathematics courses except by permission of the chair. Offered fall and spring semester. Prerequisite(s): MATH 110  or placement.
  
  •  

    MATH 121 - Trigonometry

    (3)
    Trigonometric functions and graphs; trigonometric equations and identities; inverse trigonometric functions; trigonometric applications. Not open to any student with credit for higher numbered mathematics courses except by permission of the chair. Offered fall and spring semester. Prerequisite(s): MATH 120  or placement.
  
  •  

    MATH 140 - Integrated Mathematics I

    (4)
    A deep understanding of mathematics content and mathematical practices designed for future elementary school teachers. Topics: Problem Solving. Number and Operations in Base Ten (number systems, place value, the meaning of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division, strip/tape diagram and number lines). Number and Operations Fractions (The meaning of fraction and adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing whole numbers, decimals, integers and fractions, ratios and proportional relationships, strip/tape diagram, double number lines, tables). (Offered fall and spring sester.) Prerequisite(s): Restricted to certain education majors only.
  
  •  

    MATH 141 - Integrated Mathematics II

    (4)
    A deep understanding of mathematics content and mathematical practices designed for future elementary school teachers. Topics: Algebraic Thinking (expressions and solving equations). Geometry (visualization, properties of angles, circles, spheres, triangles, and quadrilaterals, transformations, congruence, and similarity). Measurement (length, area, and volume). Statistics and Date Analysis (random samples, basic descriptive statistics, comparing distribution). Probability (experimental probability and probability of compound events). (Offered fall and spring semester.) Prerequisite(s): Restricted to certain education majors only.
  
  •  

    MATH 193 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 4)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College.  Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  •  

    MATH 215 - Elementary Statistics

    (3)
    A study of the concepts of descriptive statistics; counting techniques; probability, including experimental probability; special distributions; confidence intervals; tests of hypotheses; correlation and regression and applications that emphasize the behavioral, biological, and management sciences. Note: not open to students with credit for  . This course satisfies the Signature Learning Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Prerequisite(s): MATH 110  or placement in to Math-215. 
  
  •  

    MATH 222 - Introduction to Data Science

    (3)


    An introduction to methods and techniques commonly used in data science. The management, preparation, analysis, visualization, and modeling of data will be discussed in this class. (Offered spring only, even years.)

      Prerequisite(s): CS 160 Introduction to Computer Science  

  
  •  

    MATH 230 - Calculus I

    (4)
    Exploration of the concepts, techniques and application of calculus through a study of the properties and applications of polynomial, rational, exponential and trigonometric functions; development of concepts of limit, continuity, differentiation and integration; applications of derivatives and integrals; the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. This course satisfies the Signature Learning Quantitative Reasoning requirement. (Offered fall and spring, all years.) Prerequisite(s): MATH 121 ; or placement into MATH 230.
  
  •  

    MATH 231 - Calculus II

    (4)
    Exploration of the techniques and application of calculus through study and further development of the concept of integration; special methods of integration; applications of the definite integral; basic differential equations; sequences and series of real numbers. This course satisfies the Signature Learning Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Offered fall and spring semester. Prerequisite(s): MATH 230 .
  
  •  

    MATH 240 - College Geometry

    (3)
    A study of advanced Euclidean geometry; transformational geometry; introduction to non-Euclidean geometry. Examination of the role of axiomatic systems in geometry. Geometric concepts and relationships are used to describe and model mathematical ideas and real world constructs. A problem-solving approach is used to investigate and understand mathematical content and formulate and solve problems from both mathematical and everyday situations. Students make and evaluate mathematical conjectures and arguments and validate their own mathematical thinking in the course. This course is required for those planning to be middle or secondary school teachers (specializing in mathematics) and may be taken by others. Prerequisite(s):   or MATH 225   or  . Offered fall semester.
  
  •  

    MATH 251 - Discrete Mathematics

    (3)
    A study of the concepts of sets, number systems, induction, the nature of proof, logic, graph theory, combinatorics, probability, recurrence relations, difference equations and algorithmic thinking. A problem-solving approach is used to investigate and understand mathematical content and formulate and solve problems for both mathematical and everyday situations. This course satisfies the General Education - Quantitative Reasoning Goal. (Offered spring semester.) Prerequisite(s): MATH 121  MATH 225  or MATH 230 
  
  •  

    MATH 252 - Introduction to Mathematical Proofs

    (4)
    An introduction to the art of reading, understanding and constructing mathematical proofs. A variety of proof techniques will be presented. Topics, with emphasis on proofs, will be drawn from set theory, functions, relations, analysis, group theory and number theory. Prerequisite(s):   MATH 225  or   or  . Offered spring semester.
  
  •  

    MATH 293 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 4)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College.  Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  •  

    MATH 310 - Mathematical Statistics

    (3)
    A study of the concepts of probability, descriptive and inferential statistics designed for mathematics majors. Students are prepared to analyze data, make predictions and make decisions. (Offered fall semester in even years.) Prerequisite(s): MATH 231 .
  
  •  

    MATH 315 - Intermediate Statistics

    (3)
    A study of how to apply advanced statistical techniques to real data.  Topics will cover non-parametric methods, t-tests, regression, ANOVA, multiple regression, design of experiments, and categorical data analysis techniques.  Students will also learn R programming.  Prerequisite(s): MATH 215 Elementary Statistics  or MATH 310 Mathematical Statistics .
  
  •  

    MATH 320 - Linear Algebra

    (3)
    A study of the major concepts of linear algebra including theory of vector spaces, linear transformations, matrices, determinants, linear programming, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. (Offered fall semester in odd years.) Prerequisite(s): MATH 251  or MATH 252 
  
  •  

    MATH 330 - Calculus III

    (4)
    Exploration of the techniques and application of calculus through a study of vectors in two and three dimensions, three-dimensional analytic geometry; and multi-variable calculus with applications. Prerequisite(s): MATH 231 . Offered spring semester.
  
  •  

    MATH 335 - Differential Equations and Dynamical Systems

    (3)
    A modeling approach is used to cover techniques for solving a variety of Ordinary Differential Equations (ODE): linear (first and higher order), non-linear, and systems of ODEs. The course also examines methodologies for solving linear and non-linear continuous dynamic systems. Offered spring semester in even years.  Prerequisite(s): MATH 231 .
  
  •  

    MATH 340 - History of Mathematics

    (3)
    A study of the historical developments in mathematics including the contributions of underrepresented groups and diverse cultures. Topics include: development of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, trigonometry, calculus, number theory, probability, statistics, and discrete mathematics. This course is required for those planning to be secondary school teachers and may be taken by others. (Offered spring semester in even years.) Prerequisite(s): MATH 230  or  .              
  
  •  

    MATH 351 - Introduction to Combinatorics

    (3)
    An introduction to enumerative combinatorics. Topics include permutations, combinations, Stirling numbers, integer partitions, distribution problems, combinatorial proof, recurrence relations, generating functions, Fibonacci numbers, rook theory, and the principle of inclusion-exclusion. (Offered fall semester in even years.) Prerequisite(s): MATH 231 ;or MATH 251 ; or MATH 252 .
  
  •  

    MATH 393 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 4)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College.  Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  •  

    MATH 420 - Abstract Algebra

    (3)
    A study of the major concepts of abstract algebra and the role of axiomatic systems in algebra. Students use algebra to describe patterns, relations and functions and to model and solve problems. Major concepts studied include number theory, groups, rings, integral domains, fields and other algebraic systems. (Offered spring semester in odd years.) Prerequisite(s): MATH 252 .
  
  •  

    MATH 430 - Real Analysis

    (3)
    A study of the concepts of limits, continuity, differentiability, integrability, infinite series and power series. (Offered fall semester in odd years when there is sufficient demand.) Prerequisite(s): MATH 231 ; MATH 252 .
  
  •  

    MATH 435 - Computational and Numerical Methods

    (3)
    Students explore the solution methodology of problems in computational science with an emphasis on numerical techniques. Topics include error analysis, numerical integration and differentiation, FFTs, solutions of linear systems, and numerical solutions of ODEs. (Same course offered as  . (Offered spring semester in odd years.) Prerequisite(s): MATH 231 ; CSAC 245  or CS 245 
  
  •  

    MATH 450 - Introduction to Complex Variables

    (3)
    A study of complex series and sequences, limits and continuity, Cauchy-Riemann equations, conformal mapping, residues and contour integration. (Offered fall semester in even years when there is sufficient demand.) Prerequisite(s): MATH 252 , MATH 330 .
  
  •  

    MATH 481 - Seminar

    (1)
    Oral presentations and written reports by students on topics not covered in the curriculum; presentations by students doing research; lectures by visiting professionals and the faculty. This course is repeatable up to 3 credits. Open only to junior and senior mathematics majors or by special permission.  Offered fall and spring semester.
  
  •  

    MATH 491 - Individual Study

    (1-3)
    Intended for those students who wish to study an area of mathematics not offered in a regular course. Prior approval by the supervising professor must be secured before registration.
  
  •  

    MATH 493 - Selected Topics

    (1 - 4)
    New and different topics are offered periodically. The course is individually designed by the department or school and has stated class meetings and times. A topic may be offered only once as a selected topics course. Approval of the course must be submitted in writing to the registrar by the appropriate department head and associate provost. Subsequent offerings of the same selected topic are subject to the approval of the Curriculum Committee of the College.  Credit is normally three semester hours. Entry into the class is subject to established departmental or school policies. When offering a selected topics course, the department determines the course level.
  
  •  

    MATH 495 - Internship

    (1-4)
    Mathematics majors with junior or senior standing, with at least 30 hours completed at Capital, and a minimum grade point average of 3.0 overall and in the major, may be assigned as interns to participating organizations and work under the supervision of a sponsor and faculty member. All interns and internships must have the prior approval of the department. Repeatable to a maximum of 4 hours. Graded P/F.

Media

  
  •  

    MDIA 102 - Media Criticism and Analysis

    (3)
    Media Criticism and Analysis is designed to explore the ways in which media integrate into our everyday lives. The course will focus on the interdisciplinary nature of media, how media influences culture, and explore critical perspectives, which have contributed to our understanding of media.
  
  •  

    MDIA 112 - Introduction to Graphic Design

    (3)
    This course introduces students to the basic graphic design terminology, principles, and skills necessary for the creation and critique of print and digital media content. Students will learn industry-standard software and the fundamentals of good graphic design in order to create a variety of visual materials. (Offered fall and spring)
  
  
  •  

    MDIA 495 - Emerging Media Internship

    (0 - 12)


    Qualified students work on-site with supervisory professionals in a variety of organizations in order to develop career-oriented knowledge and skills. Departmental internship hours repeatable to a maximum of 12 credit hours. (Offered fall/spring/summer.)

     


Military Science

  
  •  

    MS 111 - Introduction to Army

    (2)


    Introduces students to the Army and the Profession of Arms.  Students will examine the Army Profession and what it means to be a professional in the U.S. Army.  The overall focus is on developing basic knowledge and comprehension of the Army Leadership Requirements Model while gaining a big picture understanding of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) program, its purpose in the Army, and its advantages for the student. Students also learn how resiliency and fitness supports their development as an Army leader. (Offered Fall)

     

  
  •  

    MS 112 - Foundations of Agile and Adaptive Leadership

    (2)
    Introduces students to the personal challenges and competencies that are critical for effective leadership. Students learn how the personal development of life skills such as critical thinking, time management, goal setting, and communication. Students learn the basics of communications process and the importance for leader’s to develop the essential skills to effectively communicate in the Army.  Students will begin learning the basics of squad level tactics that will be reinforced during a weekly lab facilitates by MSL-III cadets and supervised by cadre. (Offered spring.)
  
  •  

    MS 211 - Leadership and Decision Making

    (3)
    This course adds depth to the students understanding of the Adaptability Army Learning Area (ALA). The outcomes are demonstrated through critical and creative thinking and the ability to apply Troop Leading Procedures (TLP) to apply innovative solutions to problems. The Army Profession is also stressed through leadership forums and leadership  self-assessment. Students are then required to apply their knowledge outside the classroom in a hands-on performance-oriented environment during leadership labs team building exercises, and field training exercises. (Offered fall.)
  
  •  

    MS 212 - Army Doctrine and Team Development

    (3)
    Focuses on Army doctrine and team development. The course begins the journey to understand and demonstrate competencies as they relate to Army doctrine. Army Values, Teamwork, and Warrior Ethos and their relationship to the Law of Land Warfare and philosophy of military service are also stressed. The ability to lead and follow is also covered through Team Building exercises at squad level. Students are then required to apply their knowledge outside the classroom in a hands-on performance-oriented environment during a weekly lab facilitated by   cadets and supervised by Cadre. (Offered Spring)
  
  •  

    MS 311 - Training Management and Warfighting Foundation

    (3)
    Focuses on training management and the warfighting functions. It is a course where you will study, practice, and apply the fundamentals of Training Management and how the Army operates through the Warfighting functions. At the conclusion of this course, you will be capable of planning, preparing, and  executing training for a squad conducting small unit tactics. Includes a lab per week using peer  facilitation overseen by MSL IVs, supervised by ROTC Cadre.(Offered fall). Prerequisite(s): MS 111 , MS 112 , MS 211 , MS 212  or Cadet Initial Entry Training or approval of Professor of Military Science.
  
  •  

    MS 312 - Applied Leadership in Small Unit Operations

    (3)
    Focuses on applied leadership in small unit operations. It is a course where you will study, practice, and apply the fundamentals of direct level leadership and small unit tactics at the platoon level. At the conclusion of this course, the student will be capable of planning, coordinating, navigating, motivating and leading a platoon in the execution of a mission.  Includes a lab per week using peer facilitation overseen by MSL IVs, supervised by ROTC Cadre. Successful completion of this course will help prepare the student for the Cadet Summer Training Advance Camp, which students attend in the summer at Fort Knox, KY. (Offered spring.) Prerequisite(s):  MS 311  
  
  •  

    MS 411 - The Army Officer

    (3)
    Focuses on development of the Army Officer.  It is a course in which students will develop knowledge, skills, and abilities to plan, resource, and asses training at the small unit level.  Students will also learn about Army programs that support counseling subordinates and evaluating performance, values and ethics, career planning, and legal responsibilities.  At the conclusion of this course, students will be familiar with how to plan, prepare, execute, and continuously assess the conduct of training at the company or field grade officer level.  Includes a lab per week overseeing MSL III lesson facilitation and supervised by ROTC Cadre. (Offered Fall) Prerequisite(s): MS 311 , MS 312 .
  
  •  

    MS 412 - Company Grade Leadership

    (3)
    This course will aid in the development, knowledge, skills, and abilities required of junior officers pertaining to the Army in Unified Land Operations and Company Grade Officer roles and responsibilities. This course includes reading assignments, homework assignments, small group assignments, briefings, case studies, practical exercises, a mid-term exam, and an oral practicum as the final exam. The Oral Practicum explores the student’s knowledge of how students will be prepared for the 20 Army Warfighting Challenges (AWFC) covered throughout the ROTC Advanced Course. Successful completion of this course will assist in preparing students for the Basic Officer Leader Course and a mandatory requirement for commissioning. Includes a lab per week overseeing MSL III lesson facilitation and supervised by ROTC Cadre.(Offered spring.) Prerequisite(s): MS 411  
  
  •  

    MS 491 - Individual Study

    (1-4)
    (Offered as needed.)
  
  •  

    MS 493 - Selected Topics

    (3)
    (Offered as needed.)

Music

  
  •  

    MUSIC H060 - Choir

    (0.5)
    Ensemble choral singing, with emphasis on technical skill, care of the voice and the development of vocal color through a variety of literature. Note: This course is only offered while studying in Hungary.
  
  •  

    MUSIC H097 - Chamber Ensemble

    (0.5)
    Perform a variety of literature with others. Note: This course is only offered while studying in Hungary.
  
  •  

    MUSIC H100 - Piano

    (1-3)
  
  •  

    MUSIC H225 - Folk Music I

    (2)
    Learn the Hungarian method of folk song analysis and adapt it to folk song material of different ethnic traditions. Note: This course is only offered while studying in Hungary.
  
  •  

    MUSIC H232 - Folk Music II

    (2)
    Learn the Hungarian method of folk song analysis and adapt it to folk song material of different ethnic traditions. Note: This course is only offered while studying in Hungary.
  
  •  

    MUSIC H321 - Literature of Music I

    (2)
    A study of Hungarian and non-Hungarian works to become familiar with composers and stylistic characteristics of the music. (Replaces MUSIC 321 .) Note: This course is only offered while studying in Hungary.
  
  •  

    MUSIC H322 - Literature of Music II

    (2)
    Note: This course is only offered while studying in Hungary.
  
  •  

    MUSIC H331 - Counterpoint

    (3)
  
  •  

    MUSIC H332 - Advanced Theory and Solfege II

    (4)
    (Replaces required theory elective or an elective).
  
  •  

    MUSIC H343 - Methodology I

    (2)
    Knowledge of the concept, philosophy and main principles of the Kodaly system. Students will do some observation in Hungarian schools. (Elective) Note: This course is only offered while studying in Hungary.
  
  •  

    MUSIC H344 - Methodology II

    (2)
    Note: This course is only offered while studying in Hungary.
  
  •  

    MUSIC H358 - Conducting

    (2)
    Rudimental study of conducting technique and rehearsal leadership.
  
  •  

    MUSIC H420 - Hungarian Music Literature

    (1)
  
  •  

    MUSIC H490 - Hungarian Culture

    (3)
    Study in language, history and culture. Involves field trips.
  
  •  

    MUSIC HR301 - Hungary Recital Attendance

    (0)
    Required attendance at a minimum of 13 events in Hungary or other parts of Europe.
  
  •  

    MUSIC R101 - Recital Attendance

    (0)
    Required attendance at all scheduled area and general performance recitals for all music majors each Fall and Spring semester.
  
  •  

    MUSIC R399 - Half Recital

    (.5)
    All candidates for half recital must be enrolled for study on their primary instrument the semester they present their recital. (Offered each semester.) Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of the MUSIC 202  or MUSIC 202P  and completion of the Recital Request Form.
  
  •  

    MUSIC R498 - 16 Programs

    (0)
    Required attendance to 16 specialized professional and collegiate musical concerts including symphony, ballet, opera, as detailed in the Conservatory Student Handbook. This course is required to complete all Bachelor of Music degrees. Offered each semester. Prerequisite(s): None.
  
  •  

    MUSIC R499 - Full Recital

    (1)


    All candidates for full recital must be enrolled for study on their primary instrument the semester they present their recital. Offered each semester. 

      Prerequisite(s): Success completion of the MUSIC 301  or MUSIC 301P  and the completion of the Recital Request form.

  
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    MUSIC 042G - GROUP COMPOSITION HOUR

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    Open to composition majors or by permission of the instructor for other majors.  Students will receive weekly group lessons.  Priority will be given to Music majors.  Placement is subject to faculty load availability. Special fees are applied for instruction. Course is repeatable for credit.  It is offered only on an as-needed basis.  Prerequisite(s): None
  
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    MUSIC 50 - Orchestra

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    Open to all Capital students by audition. Rehearsing 3-6 hours per week.
  
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    MUSIC 51 - Wind Symphony

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    MUSIC 52 - Chamber Percussion Ensemble

    (1)
  
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    MUSIC 53 - Symphonic Winds

    (1)
  
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    MUSIC 55 - Big Band

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    MUSIC 56 - Fusion Band

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    MUSIC 57 - Small Jazz Ensemble

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    Jazz Consort.
  
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    MUSIC 058 - Contemporary Worship Arts Workshop

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    This course is designed to give students experience in both academic and practice of the diverse responsibilities and proficiencies needed to lead a music worship team in a contemporary worship setting.  The musicianship components include developing the “band”, stage and sound technologies, repertoire, and rehearsal; the leadership components include development of the team and the culture, leading spiritual and musical rehearsal and worship, and legal responsibilities.
  
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    MUSIC 60 - Chapel Choir

    (1)
    The Capital University Chapel Chair, a select SATB choir, which celebrates national and international acclaim as a premier collegiate choral ensemble, is the Conservatory’s most advanced choir. The choir performs a broad range of literature.   Prerequisite(s): Membership is be audition.  
 

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