Jul 16, 2024  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

Political Science and Economics Department


Return to {$returnto_text} Return to: Undergraduate Programs and Department Information

Department Chair-Baker
Associate Professors-Marilley, Postolache
Assistant Professor-Walsh
 

http://www.capital.edu/Academics/Majors-and-Minors/Political-Science/


Political Science

Political science majors offer programs of study that lead to careers in government on the city, state or federal level, or in the foreign service. It also opens career paths in local, national and international organizations, the legal profession, lobbying, secondary or university teaching and a wide variety of opportunities to continue your education in graduate school or law school.

The curriculum is structured so that the political science student acquires an understanding of political theory, comparative government, international relations, public administration and political institutions and processes.

The major is designed to develop critical thinking and independent analysis through the study of theory and its practical application. The latter is encouraged through the availability of a wide variety of internships in state and local government agencies in Columbus. Internships are also available in Washington, D.C.

Political Science Learning Outcomes:

  1. Describe the major fields and theories within the respective discipline (i.e., political science, international studies, public administration, and economics and political science), the origins of the discipline, and the contribution of the discipline in understanding society
  2. Demonstrate leadership skills and professional behaviors through curricular and co-curricular activities in the respective discipline (i.e., political science, international studies, public administration, and economics and political science)
  3. Reason logically about and critically evaluate issues in the respective discipline (i.e., political science, international studies, public administration, and economics and political science)
  4. Apply appropriate research methods to topics and activities in the respective discipline (i.e., political science, international studies, public administration, and economics and political science)
  5. Communicate clearly to different audiences in writing, orally, and with technology
  6. Practice lifelong learning
  7. Articulate the moral implications of choices, be ethically reflective and civically engaged
  8. Recognize and engage as members of interdependent communities
  9. Articulate the role human diversity plays in shaping contextual understanding of the respective discipline (i.e., political science, international studies, public administration, and economics and political science) as well as community and work environments.

Economics Learning Outcomes:

1. Use economic concepts and theories to describe and analyze economic issues

  • Identify key assumptions and understand their importance
  • Identify subjective (normative) reasoning and objective (positive) reasoning
  • Correctly classify relationships according to theoretical models or concepts
  • Given policy objectives or other desired results, recommend actions.

2. Apply theoretical concepts to deduce outcomes from given situations

  • Analyze data to distinguish trends and relationships
  • Apply economic concepts/models to the analysis of data
  • Interpret the significance of statistics
  • Distinguish between correlation and causality

3.  Build/evaluate an economic argument

  • Clearly identify the key parts of an economic argument
  • Document the history/evolution of the economic theory
  • Use appropriate data (historical or current) to illustrate economic concepts
  • Use mathematics to illustrate key economic relationships/models

Return to {$returnto_text} Return to: Undergraduate Programs and Department Information